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April 17, 1987 - Image 46

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-04-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'CV

STRICTLY KOSHER MEAT MARKET

26020 Greenfield Rd.
Oak Park in the Lincoln Shopping Center

LOCAL NEWS

CUSTOM
CLEANERS

967-4222

ALTERATIONS
LAUNDRY
• SILK FINISHING
HUNTERS SQUARE
14 Mile & Orchard Lake
Farmington Hills, MI

GLATT KOSHER MEATS

(at reasonable prices)

855-4870

HOMEMADE KISHKA KOSHER FOR PASSOVER

Fresh

59

TURKEY DRUMSTICKS

lb.

Now at Lincoln Conte

Extra Lean

'3.49

VEAL SHOULDER ROAST

EXPERIENCED
WATCH & JEWELRY
REPAIR

lb.

E & R Watch Repair

All Work Guaranteed

Many More Specials in Our Self Service Counter

Lincoln Center
26106 Greenfield Rd.
ERNEST
(313) 967-0889 Oak Park, MI 48237

Under Supervision of the Council of Orthodox Rabbis

S AM ~ SON S Dp.,0
- , I ,
VM1 .:3°
A U
IT MKT. s ie, ' s U -vp, . , al- Qi.„ -v - c,s
,, ,_ 1, 1: A..._
6718 Orchard Lake Rd.

-uNLI 1- `

0

Lo

• 851-80210 •

Extra Fancy

We'd like to Wish All Our Friends, Customers
& Relatives A Very Happy Passover

GRANNY SMITH APPLES

. . . . . . . . 59ci.

Hawaiian

$169 ea.

SWEET PINEAPPLE large size

LIEBFRAUMILCH WINE

FRESH
CARROTS

_)

2 lb. bag

49* - -.

. . . .2 Y5ths $5

FRESH
CUT
FLOWERS
DAILY

,

FRESH
SPINACH

10 oz. pkg.

r

49C

Low Chblesterol

MARLA SWISS CHEESE

$2691b.

CHAIM Names Winners
Of Essay Competition

Michael Weiss, a sopho-
more at West Bloomfield
High School, was the first
place winner in the first an-
nual writing competition
sponsored by CHAIM —
Children of Holocaust Sur-
vivors Association in Michi-
gan.
The topic of the contest was
"Why should students learn
about the Holocaust? How
can this learning experience
be applied to life today?"
In addition to a cash
award, Weiss will receive a
certificate of honor from Gov.
James Blanchard in Lansing
on April 30, Holocaust Com-
memoration Day.
Second place winner was
Ori Lev, a junior at
Southfield-Lathrup High
School, and Kevin Mackey, a
senior at Ferndale High
School, took third place.
Honorable mentions were
won by Karen Blem of Avon-
dale High School, Daniel
Bree of Andover High School,
Kris Satterfield and Shelly
Wigman, both of Ferndale

West Bloomfield High School

SKIM MILK

79*1/2 gal. ctn.

Kosher For Passover

DAIRY FRESH BUTTER

$1 69

All Specials Good Through April 22nd, 1987

Friday, April 17, 1987

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

1b pkg.

High School, and Cheryl
Wirthin of Andover. All of
the students received certifi-
cates of honor and a silver
pin that reads "zachor" (re-
member).
Eighty high schools, paroc-
hial and public, in Oakland
County were invited to par-
ticipate in the writing con-
test.
The judges for this year's
competition were: Charles
Silow, president of CHAIM;
Dr. Sidney Bolkosky, profes-
sor, University of Michigan-
Dearborn; Dr. David Harris,
director and social studies
coordinator, Oakland Schools;
and Barbara Gray, assistant
director, Greater Detroit In-
terfaith Round Table of
Christians and Jews.
CHAIM's Holocaust com-
mittee members include
chairman, Betty Ellias; Rosa
Chessler, Gail Gales and
Sherry Lipson. CHAIM plans
to offer the competition as an
annual event.
Following is the winning
essay:

The Holocaust:
Looking Backward

MICHAEL WEISS

Borden's

48

Contest winners are, from left: Ori Lev, Michael Weiss and
Kevin Mackey.

W

hen the topic of the
Holocaust is dis-
cussed, the question
inevitably arises: "Why
should we study the
Holocaust today?" The an-
swer invariably given is, "To
prevent this' sort of tragedy
from ever occurring again."
This reply has been repeated
so many times, in so many
forms, that it has become a

catch-phrase, a cliche devoid
of all meaning. But the ques-
tions remain, demanding an-
swers: Why study it today?
What do we mean by "To
prevent it from happening
again?"
The question seems ludicr-
ous. After all, how could it
happen again? We are
civilized people in today's
world. How could the sense-
less slaughter of 11 million
human beings — six million
Jews and five million non-
Jews — repeat itself? Surely,

(

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