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April 10, 1987 - Image 84

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-04-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

COOKING

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84

Friday, April 10, 1987

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

n just a few days, Jews
around the world will
welcome Pesach with a
traditional Seder. During this
ritual meal, we will partake
of special foods and read from
the Haggadah. For Manuele
Delbourgo Wasserman,
Pesach is a very special holi-
day.
Manuele explained that she
had been born in Alexandria,
Egypt, and raised there for
six years until her family
was forced to leave in 1956
because of the Suez Canal
crisis. Her mother had come
to Egypt from France after
World War II, and her father
was a native Egyptian with a
British passport. French was
Manuele's native language,
English a second language.
When her family — and
many other Jewish families
— had left Egypt, it had been
in haste, much like the bibli-
cal Exodus of the Israelites.
Also, like their ancestors, the
modern exiles could take only
what they could carry and
they faced a rather uncertain
future.
Manuele's family stayed in
England and France while
they waited for visas to enter
the United States. When the
visas were delayed, the fam-
ily went to South Africa,
where_ they lived for four
years. Finally, in 1961, they
were able to immigrate to the
U.S., where they made their
home in Queens, N.Y.
While a graduate student
at Columbia University,
Manuele met Richard Was-
serman whom she sub-
sequently married.
As busy as she is with
work and family, Manuele
still finds time for gourmet
cooking, particularly dishes
with French and Middle
Eastern influence.
The haroset at the Was-
serman Seder will be made in
the Egyptian style with
cooked dates.

Sometimes, a mina — that
is a matzo-crusted "pie" filled
with spinach-meat mixture —
might be included for a large
group or served instead of the
lamb entree.
The Seder meal will likely
be rounded out with a
French-style tossed salad and
a dried-fruit compote. It has
become a family tradition to
serve a caramel-coated mold
for dessert along with petite
almond tarts and unusual
chocolate and orange cakes.
Following are some of
Manuele Wasserman's family
recipes for Pesach.
[NOTE: Several of the re-
cipes call for vanilla and/or
almond extract. Such extracts
are usually made with grain
alcohol and would thus be
unsuitable for Pesach. How-
ever, kosher l'Pesach substi-
tutes can be found.]

EGYPTIAN-STYLE
HAROSET
8 oz. pitted dates
3 /4 cup raisins
1 1/2 medium-sized apples,
peeled, cored, and
coarsely chopped
1/2 to % cup sugar (or to
taste)
About 2 tsps. fresh lemon
juice (or to taste)
1 cup coarsely chopped
walnuts or almonds
Soak the dates and raisins
in water several hours or
overnight. Put the soaked
dates and raisins in a sauce-
pan with the apples and just
enough water to cover the
fruit. Bring to a simmer and
cook, covered, about 20 min-
utes or just until the apples
are soft. Drain off most of the
liquid, but reserve it.
Mash the fruit with a fork
or wooden spoon to form a
coarse puree. Stir in the
sugar and just enough of the
reserved cooking liquid for a
loose jam-like consistency.
Cook a few minutes longer,
stirring constantly, until the
sugar is completely dissolved.
Remove from the heat, and

Continued on Page 86

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