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April 10, 1987 - Image 67

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-04-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ENTERTAINMENT
Reel
To Reel

Dan Greenberg has found
glamor in films
away from the Hollywood hoopla

NAOMI SIEGEL

Special to The Jewish News

less, has fond memories of incidents
like the time Hayes helped him
bring a public service announce-
ment (PSA) to life for a very good
cause."
"It was in the '60s," he recalls,
• ikfter I wrote a script for the
Michigan Association for Emotion-
ally Disturbed Children, they asked
me who should be our talent.
Thinking big, I said, why not get
Helen Hayes?
"To my surprise, Miss Hayes
agreed to do our spot in New York,
where she was performing on
Broadway. On the appointed day,
this dainty little woman came in
. and grew to seem 12 feet tall,
because of her wonderful stage
presence. She read her lines beauti-
fully on the very first take.
Everyone in our crew said, Perfect!
... except Miss Hayes.
"Then she spent a full hour

Bo b McKeo wn

C

an a film career without
lots of glamour and Hol-
lywood hype be reward-
ing? You bet!" says Dan
Greenberg, Farmington Hills film
video producer, newspaper critic
and university film instructor. Sure
enough, he's had his memorable
moments working with Helen
Hayes, Claudette Colbert and Alan
Alda. Yet it's clear, he truly enjoys
sharing his expert knowledge of
film production techniques with his
students, and his considerable
knowledge of Yiddish language and
Jewish films with appreciative
audiences right around home.
Naturally, both students and
community audiences especially
enjoy hearing Greenberg recount
his occasional star treks, his early
opportunities to work with or
interview people like Hayes, Col-
bert and Alda. Level headed about
show business, Greenberg, nonethe-

Continued on next page

WEEK OF APRIL 10-16

GOIN GoPLACES

LISTINGS WELCOME

Th

Performing a pas de deux?
Screening a film? Staging a
play? If so, The Jewish News
wants to hear about it in our
new enWtainment calendar,
Going Places. Send concert,
film, dance, comedy, club
and other entertainment ac-
tivity listings to Entertain-
ment Calendar, The Jewish
News, 20300 Civic Center Dr.,
Suite 240, Southfield 48076.
Items must be typed,
double-spaced and include
the time, date, place, admis-
sion charge of each event
and a name and phone
number of someone to call
during business hours. List-
ings must be received at
least two weeks prior to pub-
lication.

MUSIC

DETROIT SYMPHONY OR-
CHESTRA: Ford Auditorium,
conductor Jerzy Semkow,
8:30 p.m. Saturday; Or-
chestra Hall, 8 p.m. today,
admission, 567-1400.

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SCHOOL OF MUSIC: McIn-
tosh Theatre, Ann Arbor,
works by Kurt Weill, 4:30
p.m. Thursday, admission,
764-0594.

-

CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY
OF DETROIT: Orchestra
Hall, classical guitarist,
Christopher Parkening, 8
p.m. Saturday, admission,
833-3700.

WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY
CHAMBER SINGERS:
Community Auditorium, WSU
campus, spring concert,
8:15 p.m. Saturday, admis-
sion, 577-2618.

CHILDREN

PEANUT BUTTER PLAYERS:
Austin Hall, 18000 E. Warren,
Detroit, The Electric Sun-
shine Man, 1 p.m. Saturdays
and Sundays through April
26, admission, reservations,
559-6727.

COBO ARENA: Cobo Hall,
Muppet Babies Live, 11
a.m. and 7:30 p.m. Wednes-
day, 7:30 p.m. Thursday,
admission, 567-6000.

THEATER

DOWNTOWN DINNER THEA-
TER: Veterans Memorial
Building banquet hall, They're
Playing Our Song, pre-
sented by Jimmy Launce
Productions, cocktails 6:30
p.m., dinner at 7, curtain at
8:45 today, every Friday and
Saturday, admission, reserva-
tions, 224-6000.

REPERTORY
DETROIT
THEATRE: 13103 Woodrow
Wilson, Detroit, Waiting for
Godot, now through April 19,
admission, 868-1347.

OAKLAND UNIVERSITY: 133
Varner Hall, Rochester,
one act festival, 10 a.m.
Saturday, free, 370 - 3013.

-

JIMMY LAUNCE PROD-
UCTIONS, INC.: Somerset
Dinner Theatre, It Had to Be
You, dinner 6 and 7 p.m.,
curtain 8:15 p.m., through
June 13, admission, 649-
6629.

JIMMY LAUNCE PROD-
UCTIONS, INC.: "The Club,"
Hyatt Regency Dearborn,

Be Back Before Midnight,

dinner 6 and 7 p.m., cocktails
8 p.m., curtain 8:30 p.m.,
through May 9, admission,
593-1234, ext. 2323.

WOODS PLAYERS: Oakland
Community College Theater,
Royal Oak, Crimes of the
Heart, 8 p.m. today and
Saturday, admission, 258-
5368.

Continued on Page 75

67

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