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March 20, 1987 - Image 60

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-03-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-

1 COUPON r

ENTERTAINMENT

WINTER SPECIAL

I GOOD 7 DAYS — ANYHOUR! ANYDAY!

BBQ Slab St. Louis Ribs for two
BBQ Chicken for two

$10.95
$6.95

Very Sporting

DINE-IN OR CARRY-OUT

THE BRASS POINTE

Continued from preceding page

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FROM 11 a.m.
24234 Orchard Lake Rd. at 10 Mile
476-1377

7

WAFFLE
WAFFLE
OMELETTE
OMELETTE

THREE
GREAT
LOCATIONS

15600 W. 10 Mile
Southfield, MI • 552-1100

28505 Northwestern • Southfield, MI • 357-2009

Buy one plain waffle or omelette
with toast and jelly get one

29556 Orchard Lake • Farmington Hills, MI • 626-0804

Party Trays • Parties from 25 to 80 • Job Promotions
Office Gatherings • Birthdays • Special Celebrations
Weddings..and much more!

limit

,

FREE!

coupon per 2 persons

Valid Monday through Friday only
No substitution : , • Expires March 31, 1987

9Zeservatio
for two
please...

Night

Packages

for two in our
One & accornrnoaations
Two
rooms.

Deluxe
newly decorated guest if staying in

stay free,
Children
in our restaurant, lounge,
parents room•
Credit
or room
service. Our restaurant offers
$25.00
breakfast, lunch
arid of daily
ariety
v
extensiveenus with a
br
inner m
e
d Complimentary
continental eakfas
s pecials.
afternoon tea served in our firesid
delivered
and
p
lobby.
Complimentary newspa er with, a
to y our roorn:
turn-down service
la
for thedies.
Nightly
chocolate on your pillow.
of pool,
sauna, whirlpool,
Complimentary
flower

ur use
xercise equipment.

and

SPECIAL WEE.KEND PACKAGE
-}- tai

OT StITI.
Fri. $85.00
& Sat. or Sat. 8z,
'Fri., Sa.t., stay,
two niglit,
-k- to.•
'145.00
Skin.
WC )‘ )e)))

A NN

P\ 011–\\VA-ON\

It-

Losers.

eet at 1 .

gem in fashionable Briarviood • .. State Str-94
liosted in the fine tradition of Eric 'Yale Lutz & Assoc.

A

60

Friday, March 20, 1987

Ca111

61:1800

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

familiar to David Letterman
fans, it's purely intentional.
Adler's parents, Sol and
Belle Adler, are in their own
right landmarks of Windsor's
Jewish community. They're
the owners of Adler's Bakery,
a venerable communal in-
stitution known for its
downtown Windsor market
branch. When Adler's
grandparents, Abraham and
Fannie Adler, founded the
firm back in 1914, it was
known as Standard Bakery of
Essex.
Sportcaster Adler plugs the
bakery unabashedly (some
would even say shamelessly)
on his show, touting its
bagels and Russian rye.
"They haven't had the
easiest life in the world,"
says Adler of his parents,
"and they wanted their kids
— I have a younger brother
and a younger sister — to go
into the bakery too. But we
always hated the bakery, just
hated it.
"I worked in the bakery
since I was just a little bug-
ger," he continues. "Before I
had my bar mitzvah I worked
in the bakery. Then for my
bar mitzvah I got to work in
the bakery some more. When
I turned 16 I drove the truck
for my dad until I was 18 or
19. Then I took off and went
to school. It was going to be
Marty Adler, M.D., or Marty
Adler, D.J., _there was defi-
nitely going to be a set of ini-
tials following my name."
Adler says "the nice Jewish
mother wanted her kid to be
a nice Jewish doctor. Well, I
went to premed school and it
lasted a year, and I ended up
getting into radio/television
in a little place called Win-
gham, Ontario, which is
about 70 miles north of Lon-
don."
And what an auspicious
debut Adler made into the
world of broadcasting! At the
age of 21 he became Cousin
Marty on a country music
show called Hayloft Hoedown.
But Adler likes to re-
member a different aspect of
his first job. "I brought rock
and roll to Wingham," he
says. "I was the Alan Freed
of Wingham."
For three years Adler
hosted a show called Marty's
Place on CKNX-TV, the tele-
vision station serving the
3,000-plus population of Win-
gham. Then he moved on to
spinning records at CKOC
radio in Hamilton where he
emceed a latenight show tag-
ged Music for Lovers and

"I was an Alan Almond be-
fore his time," says Adler. "I
started getting 4-500 letters
from fans a week, but I only
lasted three months at the
station. They fired me be-
cause I was a rebel and never
filled out the required lists of
music that I played."
Then it was on to a station

,

in St. Catharines. While he
was the morning disc jockey
at CHSC, he got a job at the
local racetrack calling the
races for the Ontario Jockey
Club, the largest track organ-
ization in Canada. That was
the beginning of Adler's sec-
ond career as a racetrack an-
nouncer. Today he's the
weekend announcer at
Windsor Raceway, where a
track official recently was
quoted in The Windsor Star
as calling Adler one of the
top five track announcers in
North America.
But back at CHSC, Adler
remembers that "after a
while, my boss had me doing
everything. I told him he was
really running a Mickey
Mouse operation if he had me
doing everything and he said
I better watch out or I could

"I always figured
I've got a great
face for radio."
When a job
opened at
then-CKLW-TV, he
became a staff
announcer.

be out on my ear. I told him
things always happen for the
best and he canned me.
"So I went back to CKOC
in Hamilton. They hired me
back and I quit on them after
ten days just to get even."
His self-imposed exile over,
Adler came back home to
Windsor in 1969. He worked
for a few months at radio sta-
tion CKWW, but then de-
cided he wanted to get out of
radio and into television. "I
always figueed I've got a
great face for radio," he says.
When a job_ opened at then-
CKLW-TV, he became a staff
announcer, the man in the
television booth.
That same year he started
hosting the Windsor Raceway
television show and calling
races there as well. But even
that wasn't enough for Adler.
"I started driving horses
too," Adler recalls. "So here's
this nice Jewish boy sitting
out there in a harness-racing
sulky driving horses. And
training horses too. I got
some horse owners in Detroit
who started out with $3,500
and liked to gamble — they
were gamblers. And in the
year and a half that I had
horses for them, they made
about $200,000.
"I mean I tried all the
time. I was always trying,
trying, and always going for
what I could get. And these
guys benefited from it."
Adler was no mean jockey
either. His track record
shows he won 93 races in his
brief career. Today, he says,
there is not one Jewish horse
racer at the Detroit tracks.

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