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February 27, 1987 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-02-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE JEWISH NE

SERVING DETROIT'S JEWISH COMMUNITY

THIS ISSUE 60c

Agencies Ponder
GM Layoff Impact

FEBRUARY 27, 1987 / 28 SHEVAT 5747

CLOSE-UP

Experts are unclear on how the lean-and-mean
approach might affect the Jewish community

The Jewish Welfare Federation
has granted a special allocation of
$300,000 to the Jewish Home for
Aged to help meet a $600,000 budget
deficit, brought on in part by Michi-
gan's low Medicaid reimbursement
rate and the increasing age and
frailty of the home's residents.
The supplementary 1986-1987
allocation—over and above the
$850,000 that Federation had
budgeted for the home in that
period—was approved last week by
Federation's United Jewish

recession of the early '80s which sent
thousands to the Sun Belt? If Michi-
gan enters another recession, what
will the effect be on Detroit's Jews?
How closely is our community tied to
the region's auto and steel economy?
While a recession seems remote
now, local Jewish agencies are warily
following events. Spokesmen are not
at all in agreement about the current
state of affairs or what the future
holds.
The effect of an economic
downturn will not be immediate on
the general Jewish population, ac-
cording to Margaret Weiner, director
of professional services at Jewish
Family Service. "It takes a year or
two for the problems to trickle down."
Not all Jews are professionals,
working far from Detroit's industrial
center, Dr. Conrad Giles, president of
the Jewish Welfare Federation,
points out. "In these layoffs, certainly
there will be Jewish factory workers
directly affected. It will affect
suppliers (to GM) in our community."
Just whether another recession
is on the way is unclear. At Jewish
Family Service, says Weiner, opinion
is divided whether the GM layoffs are
a harbinger of economic distress in
the Jewish community.
Says Dr. Giles: "At this point we
have no indication (from local Jewish
agencies) that there is any surge of
increased demand. They are ex-
tremely sensitive indicators."
But Albert Ascher, executive di-
rector of Jewish Vocational Services
has seen a subtle shift recently.

Continued on Page 21

Continued on Page 16

DAVID HOLZEL

Staff Writer

"What's good for General Motors
is good for the country." That often-
repeated axiom may not hold true
anymore, especially in Detroit. The
giant automaker announced this
month that it will cut $10 billion in
costs by 1990. Earlier, GM an-
nounced that it will close six assem-
bly plants and five metal fabricating
plants over three years. Twenty-nine
thousand jobs will be eliminated,
two-thirds of them in the Detroit
area.
How will the closings affect
Metro Detroit, which is just begin-
ning to regain its confidence after the

Jewish Home
Budget Bind

Staff Report

SUBURBAN
ADVENTURE

Have Jewish
Hospitals Outlived
Their Purpose?
22

Jewish foster
children found
being taken
to church

FOSTERING
73 RELIGION 41

Kids enjoy all types of
camp activities in
heart of the city

Amazing Marketplace
Anniversaries
Births
Editorials
Engagements
Entertainment
Obituaries
Seniors
Single Life
Torah Portion
Women
Youth

89
74
82
6
76
55
106, 107
46
85
18
48
84

CANDLELIGHTING 6:02 P.M.

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