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February 13, 1987 - Image 125

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-02-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ENTERTAINMENT

Bob McKeown

Despite working
at a 2000-degree
oven, sculptor
Stuart Shulman
doesn't blow
his cool

I -

DEBBIE WAWS LANDAU

Special to The Jewish News

t has been said that fire and
water don't mix.
But for sculptor Stuart
Shulman, those elements form a
pleasing and successful combi-
nation.
Daytimes, the artist-in-
residence at the Birmingham-
Bloomfield Art Association depends
on the consistency of a 2000-degree
Fahrenheit oven to create his bril-
liant blown-glass pieces.

Evenings, he usually unwinds at
his Elizabeth Lake-front hothe,
where the sunsets over the water
are gorgeous and inspiring. I have
always been fascinated with water,
and I think it shows in my work."
Shulman's reverence for aquatic
life is indeed visible in the personal
treasures perched on the various sills
and occasional tables in his airy
home on the private lake. A lumines-
cent amethyst piece is reminiscent of

shells and mysterious marine crea-
tures. There's a stunning cobalt blue
bowl hinting of the ocean's deepest
hues. Co-existing quite nicely with
the sturdy but fragile seeming
glassworks are examples of raku —
straight, smoked clay vessels in sub-
tle colors — as well as bronze figura-
tive works. Some suggest primitive
artifacts and folkloric legends, others
have a contemporary appearance.
All of the works are indicative of

the versatility of the 36-year-old ar-
tist who operates one of only two
legitimate glass-blowing facilities in
the Detroit area.
Shulman's progress is impres-
sive for a relative newcomer to the
medium of glass. "My works in clay
supported me for ten years," he in-
forms. After first completing a
Bachelor of Fine Arts program and
post-graduate work at Wayne State

Continued on next page

WEEK OF FEBRUARY 13-1 9

GOING oPLACES

LISTINGS WELCOME

Performing a pas de deux?
Screening a film? Staging a
play? If so, The Jewish News
wants to hear about it in our
new entertainment calendar,
Going Places. Send concert,
film, dance, comedy, club
and other entertainment ac-
tivity listings to Entertain-
ment Calendar, The Jewish
News, 20300 Civic Center Dr.,
Suite 240, Southfield 48076.
Items must be typed,
double-spaced and include
the time, date, place, admis-
sion charge of each event
and a name and phone
number of someone to call
during business hours. List-
ings must be received at
least two weeks prior to pub-
lication.

SPECIAL EVENTS

MUSIC HALL CENTER: 350
Madison Ave., Detroit, Na-
tional Cultural Theatre and
Dance Company of Gambia,

8 p.m. Saturday, admission,
963-7680.

MUSIC

OAKLAND UNIVERSITY CEN-
TER FOR THE ARTS: Varner
Recital Hall, Rochester, Re-
naissance music and dance,

8 p.m. Saturday and 3 p.m.
Sunday, admission, 370-3013.

CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY
OF DETROIT: Orchestra Hall,

concert, 8 p.m. Saturday, ad-

mission, 833-3700.

AMERICAN ARTISTS SERIES:

ward Ave. Detroit, concert, 10
and 11:30 a.m. Sunday, ad-
mission, 832-2730.

10:30 p.m. today and Satur-
day, admission, 634-5208.

Cranbrook Kingswood Au-
ditorium, Bloomfield Hills,

Classical guitarists Celin
and Pepe Romero, 2 p.m.

Sunday, admission, 647-2230.

WARREN SYMPHONY OR-
CHESTRA: Warren Wogds
Community Theater, concert
expressing seascapes and
landscapes, 7:30 p.m. Sun-

day, admission, 754-2950.

LYRIC
ENSEMBLE:

CHAMBER

Edsel and
Eleanor Ford House in Grosse
Pointe, concert, 3:30 p.m.
Sunday, admission, 357-1111.
BRUNCH WITH BACH: Detroit
Institute of Arts, 5200 Wood-

HOLLY HOTEL: 110 Battle Al-
ley, Holly Those. Generics
and Sheila Kay, 8:30 and

COMEDY

COMEDY CASTLE AND
CAFE: 2593 Woodward,
Berkley, Glenn Hirsch, 8:30

and 11:30 p.m. today and
Saturday; Tim Allen, 8:30 p.m.
Tuesday through Feb. 21, ad-
mission, reservations, 542-
9900.
COMEDY CROSSING: 23055
Telegraph at 9 Mile Rd., South-
field, Ron Coden 8:30 and 11
p.m. today and Saturday
through Feb. 28, admission,
353-3798.

CHILDREN

TEMPLE BETH EL: 7400 Tele-
graph, Birmingham, chil-
dren's concert, 1:30 p.m..

Sunday, free, 851-1100.

PEANUT BUTTER PLAYERS:

Austin. Hall, 18000 E. Warren,
Detroit, The Electric Sunshine
Man, 1 p-.m. Saturdays and
Sundays through April 26, ad-
mission, reservations, 559-
6727.

Continued on next page

53

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