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February 13, 1987 - Image 118

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-02-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN.

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Tradition! Tradition!

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Friday, February 13, 1987 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

omething old,

6 S something new,

something borrowed,
something blue." This is a
standard rhyme most
brides hear before their
wedding. They gather all
the requisite items: a penny
(something old), a garter
belt with blue satin trim
(something blue), a lacy
white handkerchief
(something new), and their
mom's pearl earrings
(something borrowed).
Where did this custom
originate? Maybe it was the
creative idea of a young
photographer. My wedding
album is certainly full of
pictures portraying this
rhyme. Here I am smiling
wickedly into the camera as
my father-in-law-to-be
places the garter belt on my
lower leg. Here's my father
holding the penny about to
be-plunked into my white
satin shoe .. .
In the midst of all this
silly fun, let's not forget the
Jewish wedding traditions.
Some we take for granted;
some we've all but
forgotten. Each will add
beauty and meaning to your
wedding.
AUFRUF
This is the honor of being
called up to read from the
Torah in the synagogue on
the Sabbath morning before
the wedding. Today, many
Conservative and Reform
services call up both the
groom and the bride.
Traditionally, the groom is
called up. A wonderful
custom is to throw candy
and raisins at the groom (or
bride) after the final
blessings. This is symbolic
of a sweet life and an omen
of fertility.
KETUBAH
Today's ketubah is
hardly the bill of sale it was
in ancient times. It is still
regarded as the legal
marriage contract and must
be signed by two witnesses
before the wedding
ceremony. Many local and
Israeli artists create
beautiful, decorated and
hand printed Ketubbot,
suitable for framing.

HUPPAH
Huppah means covering
or protection. Often it is a

canopy, tapestry, or tallit
supported by four poles. It is
symbolic of both the bridal
chamber and the new home
and reminds us that Jewish
weddings traditionally are
held outdoors, as an omen
that the marriage should be
blessed with as many
children as there are stars!
PROCESSION
Believe it or not, there is
no basis in Jewish tradition
for the common practice of
the bride walking down the
aisle with her father, as if
he is "giving her away." The
Jewish tradition suggests
both fathers accompanying
the groom and both
mothers, the bride, or each
being accompanied by both
parents.
DRINKING WINE
During the ceremony, the
bride and groom recite a
blessing over and drink two
cups of wine. Personalize
this custom and use your
own heirloom kiddush cups.
RING
Traditionally, the ring
exchanged under the
huppah must belong to the
groom, be of plain metal,
without stones, and without
any holes, but not
necessarily pure gold.
Historically, this
eliminated any
misunderstanding as to the
ring's value. Symbolically,
it represents the union of
two people, a wholeness and
harmony.
BREAKING THE
GLASS
The groom stamps on it
with his foot at the end of
the ceremony; this is the
signal for the music and the
mazel toys to begin! The
glass breaking reminds us
of the Temple's destruction,
how sadness and joy are
intermixed and how
permanent and irrevocable
marriage is (a smashed
glass is certainly
irrevocable.)
YIHUD
Here is a custom adhered
to infrequently in
Conservative or Reform
weddings, that would be a
welcome addition. The
Yihud is the private
meeting between the bride
and groom that takes place
immediately after the
ceremony. Historically, it
allowed the bride and
groom to consummate the

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