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January 23, 1987 - Image 44

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1987-01-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

JEWELRY APPRAISALS

At Very Reasonable Prices

L

30400 Telegraph Road
Suite 134
Birmingham. Mi. 48010

?ritcji n

\

established 1919

FINE JEWELERS

GEM , DIAMONO SPECIALIST

(313) 642-5575

Daily 10:00-5:30
Thurs. 10:00-8:30
Sat. 10:00-5:00

AWARDED CERTIFICATE BY GIA
IN GRADING AND EVALUATION

BE A WINNER, PLAY

FOCUS

Call For An Appointment

THE CLASSIFIEDS

Call The Jewish News
Today

354-6060

STARK HICKEY FORD

DOES IT AGAIN!

850 NEW '87 UNITS AVAILABLE!

1987 FORD

TEMPO GL

• Front Wheel Drive
• Rack & Pinion Steering
• Power Brakes
• Power Brakes
• Electronic Radio
• Digital Clock
• Bodyside Moldings
• Bucket Seats
• All Standard Equipment!

SALES,
FINANCE OR
LEASE???

CALL OR SEE:
TERRY DEUTCH

538-6600

LOOK
AT THE

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1987 FORD












TEMPO SPORT GL














Convenience Group
Front Center Armrest
Prem. Sound System
Speed Control
Tilt Wheel
Air
Cloth Seats
Am Fm Cass. Radio
Light Group
Aluminum Wheels
Performance Wheels
Tinted Glass

AIR CONDITIONING
HD BATTERY
REAR DEFROSTER
TINTED GLASS
INTERVAL WIPERS
DUAL MIRRORS
SPEED CONTROL
POWER STEEFUNG
TILT WHEEL
CLOTH SEATS

1987 EXP

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'MT'

RANGER — PAYMENTS FROM $112•
BO
RONC 11 — PAYMENTS FROM $221••

REBATES)

$500 - RANGERS
$600 - BRONCO II'S

(

FREE DURAUNER

ALL RANGERS
SOLD FROM STOCK
THRU 2-16-87

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F150 PAYMENTS FROM

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$ 203 48**

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delivery!

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Redford

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Friday, January 23, 1987

[

BRONCO 4X4 PAYMENTS FROM

1987 FORD

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& BRONCO II'S

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THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

VANS &

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Dealing With Immigrants
A Challenge For L.A.

TOM TUGEND

Special to the Jewish News

L

os Angeles — As the

favorite destination of
waves of legal and il-
legal immigrants from Latin
America and the Far East,
Los Angeles has been dubbed
the new Ellis Island. Jewish
immigrants, in smaller
streams and from other parts
of the world, have also been
attracted to Southern Calif-
ornia and the Jewish com-
munity is now trying to cope
with the needs and integra-
tion of the newcomers.
Four main groups make up
the bulk of Jewish immi-
grants during the past 13
years, according to a recent-
ly completed study by a
special task force of the
Metropolitan Region of the
L.A. Jewish Federation
Council.
The groups consist of Jews
from the Soviet Union, who
number about 14,000; from
South Africa, approximately
2,000 in Los Angeles and
neighboring Orange counties,
and another 500 in San
Diego; and from Iran, be-
tween 15,000 and 30,000. The
task force found it hardest to
get a fix on the number of
Israelis living in Los Angeles,
with "authoritative"
estimates ranging from a low
of 10,000 to a high of 120,000.
The total Jewish popula-
tion of Greater Los Angeles is
550,000. But given the low
birth rate and high level of in-
termarriage, the newcomers
have been a strong factor in
maintaining the numerical
strength and relative youth-
fulness of the community. In
this light, a major aim of the
task force's findings is to
harness the immigrants to
communal endeavors, includ-
ing social, religious and
charitable activities.
Other goals, according to
the task force report, are "to
provide services which ad-
dress (the newcomers') needs
and problems" and "increase
appreciation of the positive
impact which immigrants
have on our community."
Although the four groups
face diverse barriers to ad-
justment and integration in
the New World, the demo-
graphers, social workers, lay
leaders and spokesmen for
the newcomers on the task
force listed three Overriding
priorities on the immigrants'
agenda: help in finding jobs,
help in learning English (ex-
cept the South Africans), and
help in financing a Jewish
education for their children.

The focus of the task force
study was not on the newest
newcomers, but on immi-
grants who arrived in Amer-
ica during the last three to
seven years, according to

Bobbi Asimow, assistant di-
rector of the M
_ etropolitan
Region.
Soviet Jews started coming
to Los Angeles in the mid
'70s and appear to have had
the most difficulty in finding
suitable jobs and in becoming
part of the community. Their
spokesmen were the most re-
luctant to meet with the task
force, due perhaps to their
poor English but more likely
because of the deeply in-
grained distrust of all
"governmental" bodies, an at-
titude justifiably formed in
their native country.
That suspicion has also
kept them from joining Jew-
ish organizations, except for
a Pioneer Women chapter
made up entirely of Soviet
Jews, or from contributing to
communal fund drives.
By contrast, the South
Africans have had the easiest
time of it. They have no
language problem, are readily
accepted, and, after some
struggle, can usually find pro-
fessional positions similar to
the ones they left behind.
The South Africans are
also helped by a strong tradi-
tion of communal involve-
ment and synagogue affili-
ation. However, leaders of SA-
JAC (South African Jewish
American Community) warn
that the anticipated next
wave of their Jewish country-
men will arrive with fewer
financial and occupational
resources and may need help
from the larger community.
The Israelis stand some-
where between the Russians
and the South Africans. Since
they take their Jewishness for
granted, Israelis see no need
to join community groups or
synagogues, notes the report,
and adds:
"In fact, (the Israelis) often
resent paying dues to attend
religious services or being
asked to make contributions
to the Jewish community,
since this was not the custom
in Israel!'
However, there is some
organized bonding among
Israelis, as in the Hebrew-
speaking Shalom Lodge of
B'nai B'rith, the Israeli
Business and Professional
Group, and an Israeli Boy
Scout troop. In addition, the
report continues, many Is-
raelis are anxious to enroll
their children in Jewish day
schools, but need financial
help in the form of schol-
arships.
The first groups of Jews
arriving from Iran were well-
to-do businessmen but recent
waves have been quite poor.
They are continuing to come,
and some 400 are expected
this year, more than settled
last year, says Ethel Taft of
the Jewish Family Service.
Iranian Jews bring with
them a history of communal

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