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December 19, 1986 - Image 36

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-12-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

J EAN LAS SALE

Army Camp. Educates
Low School Achievers

THIS SPACE CONTRIBUTED BY THE PUBLISHER

There's
Hidden Money
In Your
Basement!

Like a cloud with a golden lining,
a wisp of beauty in white and yellow 18K gold.
Thin, elegant and ultra-supple. As only
Jean Lassale can craft a watch.

JULES R. SCHUBOT

3001 West Big Beaver Road • Suite 112 • Troy, Michigan 48084 • (313) 649-1122



In Our
Amazing Marketplace

354-6060

jewellers — gemologists

Registered Jeweler

SELL IT FAST

American Gem Society

THE JEWISH NEWS

1986 Joon Lossole usc

YAACOV HELLER
DESIGNS

Special Showing of

YAACOV HELLER JEWELRY

Thurs., Dec. 18th-Sun., Dec. 21

Hours:

jhurs. 10-8:30_6,m.
& Sot. 10-6:p.-M. -
Sun. 12-5 p.m.

Review his collection of
sterling silver and 24K
gold plate jewelry.
Necklaces, bracelets,
earrings and figurines.
Meer a Yaacov Heller
representative, here to
describe the delicate and
exacting techniques he
has perfected in creating
these unique pieces. Any
design may be special
ordered for yourself or as
a holiday gift to be
treasured. Please allow 4
to 6 weeks for delivery.

Uoz %herrn

BLOOMFIELD PLAZA
MAPLE AT TELEGRAPH
BIRMINGHAM, M • 855-8855

36

Friday, December 19, 1986 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Jerusalem — The Israel
Defense Forces have always
been a citizen's army. It is
not surprising, then that the
military has taken over cer-
tain functions of the civilian
establishment, such as basic
education.
Before the 1973 Yom Kip-
pur War, many potential
soldiers were not inducted
because of their low educa-
tional level. Their rejection
further handicapped the al-
ready socially and
economically-disadvantaged
youth, for army service is an
integrating factor and key to
finding a respectable job. To
stem the problem, various
educational programs were
established by the IDF, espe-
cially by former Chief of Staff
Rafael Eitan, among them
"For Israel's Defense" (LIBI:
Lem.a'an Bitachon Yisrael).
LIBI sponsors different
programs for men on differ-
ent levels; draftees are tested
and sent to the appropriate
educational unit. The men
who are sent to Givat Olga, a
former Soldiers Welfare
Association camp, have high
physical profiles but show the
lowest grade school achieve-
ment. Some 300-500 of them
come for seven weeks of basic
training that includes an
education that they never
saw in the public school sys-
tem because they either
turned it off or dropped out.
Grouped into classes of eight
to 12 at Olga, they are
taught Hebrew language
skills, math, modern Jewish
history and the geography of
Israel. Those in the highest
classes learn extra subjects
determined by the individual
teachers.
Other LIBI bases have
enrichment programs for men
on the high school level who
are somewhat literate. The
short range goal of this and
other educational units is to
motivate these soldiers to
serve their country; the long
term objective is to make
them better citizens after
their service.
The teachers in Givat Olga
are young women who volun-
teer for the job. They are
tested rigorously and inter-
viewed, after which they go
through a two-and-a-half
month training course. In
order to succeed, the teachers
must be tough, exclude self-
confidence and want to com-
mand. They must not smile
nor get chummy with the
soldiers, who do not take well
to discipline of any kind. At
Olga, in addition to teaching
their pupils all of the subjects
not absorbed in school, the
educators march the soldiers
from one class to another,
supervise inspection, exercise
with and guide them on tours
around the country.
These women often bring a
novel approach to command-
ing. History classes, for
example are not taught by
the lecture method. After the
basic facts are given, the

soldiers divide into groups
and go out to the field to play
the historical roles of the
British, Jews and the Arabs
in whatever period they are
studying. They make their
own custumes, construct their
own watchtowers, invent
their own dialogue and contr-
ive schemes for such activi-
ties as passing clandestine
arms to the underground or
protecting the Yishuv, the
pre-state settlement.

World Zionist Press Service

Persecution
`Sinful,
Pope Says

Sydney (JTA) — Pope John
Paul II was addressing
leaders of Australia's Jewish
community. But his words
were a message to the Chris.-
tian world: "No valid theo-
logical justification can ever
be found for acts of discrim-
ination or persecution against
Jews. In fact, such acts must
be held to be sinful."
The Pontiff, on his visit
here last month, at his re-
quest met with a delegation
of nine Jewish leaders, led by
Leslie Caplan, president of
the Executive Council of
Australian Jewry.
His condemnation of anti-
Semitism followed a state-
ment in which the Pope
recognized that this "is still
the century of the Shoah"
(Holocaust) and emphasized
the words of the Nostra
Aetate encyclical of 1965 in
which the Catholic Church
deplored "the hatred, persecu-
tion and displays of anti-
Semitism directed against
the Jews at any time by
anyone."
The meeting took place in
the Presbytery of St. Mary's
Cathedral on the morning of

N

Sidney.

Univ. Of Hartford
Gets Hillel

Hartford, Conn. (JTA) —
The University of Hartford is
the site of the first B'nai
B'rith Hillel Foundation to be
founded in the 1980's, accord-
ing to Rabbi William Rudolph,
the organization's national
director of personnel.
Hartford Hillel Rabbi Yosef
Grodsky believes the newly
formed foundation will com-
plement the university's
Maurice Greenberg Center <
for Judaic Studies, founded
last year. Funding for the
chapter and the university's
first full-time rabbi came
from the Greater Hartford
Jewish Federation in coopera-
tion with the national founda-
tion, The Rhode Island
Herald reports.

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