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December 19, 1986 - Image 23

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-12-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

had a subpoena in November
to interview Patalauskas,
who invoked Fifth Amend-
ment protection against self-
incrimination. Wolf said OSI
is charging Patalauskas with
non-compliance with the sub-
poena.
At a hearing to be held
Tuesday, U.S. District Judge
Richard F. Suhrheinrich will
determine whether Patalaus-
kas can claim the. Fifth
Amendment for crimes corn-
mitted outside the U.S. In
addition, although U.S. im-
migration records show
Patalauscus entered the
country in 1949, he never
applied for American citizen-
ship.
Patalauskus is the third
Detroit area resident charged
with war crimes or with
being a Nazi sympathizer.
In June, denaturalization
procedings began against
Johann Leprich of Clinton
Township, whom the Justice
Department accused - of being
a member of the Waffen SS
Corps, also known as the
Death's Head Battalion. The
government charged that
Leprich lied about his past
when he moved to the U.S. in
1952. He became an Ameri-
can citizen in 1958.
In a deposition filed this
week in U.S. District Court
in Detroit, Leprich admitted
to his wartime membership,

but said that he "never hurt,
mistreat or kill any human
being."
No date has been set for a
hearing on the government's
request Monday that U.S.
District Judge Barbara Hac-
kett issue a summary judg-
ment in the case.
Archbishop Valerian Trifa
of Grass Lake, head of the
Romanian Orthodox Church
in the U.S., was deported to
Portugal in August 1984
after he stopped contesting a
U.S. deportation suit. Trifa is
accused of inciting the fascist
Iron Guard against Jews in
Bucharest in 1941. Hundreds
of Jews were killed.
Wolf would not reveal how
many more Michigan resi-
dents OSI is investigating. As
to why the office, set up in
1979, has been slow to prose-
cute suspected war criminals,
Wolf explained that investi-
gations are carried out "the
old fashioned way," through
research by historians and
investigators.
"Investigative work is ex-
tremely time consuming," he
said, taking place in archives
all over the world. When OSI
is ready to go to court, the
cases are put on a civil doc-
ket, which has a lower prior-
ity than criminal cases, and
so take longer to come to
trial.

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LET YOUR EMOTIONS
CARRY YOU AWAY

YOUR INTELLECT
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Israeli Resort Town
Site Of New Yeshivah

Jerusalem — Everyone has
a stereotyped picture of Eilat:
the uninhibited life on the
beach; the coral islands; the
luxury hotels and the neon
lights which give the city an
atmosphere of "fun city." In
fact, this is only true of lower
Eilat.
In upper Eilat, where the
native population lives,
people are no different from
Israelis anywhere in the
country: they are continually
fixing their cooling system
and concerned about the
usual Israeli problems of
army service, child rearing
and generally making ends
meet.
To these two contrasting
communities a third ingre-
dient has been added. In 1984
an idealistic group of young
Torah scholars, most of them
army graduates, formed a
Kollel in Eilat to study Tal-
mud in the traditional
yeshivah fashion. Their
influence, according to a
member of the municipality,
has gone far and beyond their
number.
What attracts a minyan of
religious yeshiva scholars
and their wives to settle in a
basically secular city far from
the Orthodox centers of the
country? Michael, one of the
founding members answers,
"We were attracted by the
challenge of establishing a
new spiritual center. People

think that just because Eilat
is a port city with a flourish-
ing tourist trade, there's no
scope for Judaism. We've
learned otherwise."
The Eilat Kollel was
founded in September 1984
by Rabbi Joshua Zukerman,
a rabbi at Jerusalem's Mer-
caz HaRav Yeshivah. Rabbi
Zukerman and Rabbi Israel
Hess of Bar Ilan University,
had been visiting Eilat
periodically over the last
twelve years in the
framework of Jerusalem's
Machon Meir, an organiza-
tion designed to teach basic
Judaism and tradition in out-
lying areas. It has proven
very popular among Baalei
Teshuvah (newly Orthodox)
but it is different from other
such institutions as it
encourages a positive attitude
to the State of Israel and an
involvement in its everyday
life. Ray Zukerman and Ray
Hess wereparticularly suc-
cessful in Eilat in attracting
people from all walks of life
to begin studying in their
yeshivah.
One burly Israeli sailor, for
example, was incensed by a
poster announcing a lecture
by Rabbi Hess with the
catchy title, "Eretz Yisrael
Doesn't Belong to the Jewish
People." Even though he was
rarely a man of thought, the
sailor went to the lecture.

.



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