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December 19, 1986 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-12-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

II

• •

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Money Market Rate
in the
Detroit Metropolitan Area
Among Major Financial Institutions
— for —

143

Consecutive Weeks

Franklin
Savings

INSTANT LIQUIDITY

INTEREST RATES AS OF: 12-17-86

MONEY MARKET RATES'

FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

Franklin Savings

5.90

Comerica
Empire of America
First Federal of Michigan

5.10
5.73

5.10
5.20

First of America

5.15

Manufacturers
Michigan National of Detroit

National Bank of Detroit

5.05
5.10

Standard Federal

5.10

•Bosed on S10.000 deposit Some
minimum deposit requirements may
be lower Higher rotes may be
available for larger deposits

HIGH YIELD
$1,000 $50,000 $100,000

MONEY FUND

MONEY FUND

MONEY FUND

5.55 ° 5.69'0 6.00 0 6.17 ° 6.05 0 6.22%

An n ual
Pi% enta , 4t.
I:ate

0

0

0

0

EffeLH„.

Ai.„,,„,

Lik ,u, i.

A„„..1

Annual
Yield

l'er, t. nta, ,
Marc

Annual
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rer, entai..
Rate

Elio. t lye
Annual
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iftes,

Annual Percentage Rate

Effective Annual Yield

■ COMPOUNDED •

■ INCOME

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18

Equal
Housing
Lender ,

Friday, December 19, 1986 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

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CLOSE-UP

Freedom Shock

Continued from Page 16

language daily that one of
the delegation members who
had called on him was a lead-
ing PLO supporter on the
West Bank. For someone who
was keeping his own counsel
on such issues, a meeting
with leading PLO supporters
was a stunning move, and
the media played it for all it
was worth.
Shcharansky was not so
much embarrassed as furious
at having been duped: By
playing on his goodwill, he
says, his visitors had used
him to score a public rela-
tions point — used him in the
way he is warning Western
leaders that Gorbachev is
using them.
In a paid advertisement
which appeared in the
English-language Jerusalem
Post the following day,
Shcharansky left little to the
imagination when he fired a
broadside in unequivocal lan-
guage against the PLO — a
"criminal terror organiza-
tion," a • "pestilence that
threatens all civilized
people," and "cut-throats"
were some of the epithets he
employed.
However, the incident
served to underscore his
acute vulnerability as a
"symbol," sharpening his
awareness that every step he
takes and every utterance he
makes is subjected to the
most intense public examina-
tion.
"I cannot permit myself to
do what other people do hun-
dreds of times a day," he
says. Not because of the
damage an uncalculated ac-
tion could cause him person-
ally — "I'm not trying to
make a political career" —
but because of the harm it
could do to those things he
has come to represent: Israel
and the cause of Soviet
Jewry.
After such an encounter,
does Shcharansky have fears
for his personal safety? "If
you start thinking about such
things, you must stop think-
ing about a normal life," he
replies matter-of-factly.
Whatever Shcharansky
does or does not do, though,
he is bound to lose, at least
in some eyes. Indeed, some of
his most bitter critics come
from among the ranks of
Soviet Jews who do not
criticize him for what he
stands for, but rather for who
he is.
While the overwhelming
majority admire his strength
and courage — he personally
helped many to reach Isarel
— there is a hardcore which
resents him simply because
he is Anatoly Shcharansky.
Many Jews who left the
Soviet Union suffered depri-
vations and hardships on the
way to Israel, they charge.
Why should one man receive
all the glory, all the honor?
Shcharansky acknowledges
the sentiments: "On the day
after I arrived there was a
report in a Russian-language

publication that I had been
given a free apartment by the
government — and, 'Look,'
they said, 'there is the Minis-
ter of Absorption giving him
the keys.'
"Well, I never got a free
apartment, but nevertheless,
they had letters about why I
got an apartment and others
didn't ... They had a long
discussion about a question
that existed only in their im-
agination.
"I also hear from some
people that I am getting
$3,000 a month from the
Jewish Agency — there are
different figures, different
rumors — and that I got
$100,000 from Reagan.
"The fact is simply that I
never got any of this, but I do
have some money because I
was the only one who was
privileged to sign a good con-
tract with a publisher — and
I am also the only one who is
spending a lot of money on
Soviet Jewry."
As for those who begrudge
him his fame and fortune: "It
is simply a matter of envy,"
he says.
Are there aspects of Israel
that have proved to be a dis-
appointment to the man who
came within a whisker of los-
ing his life in the struggle to
reach its shores?. "Lack of
tolerance," he says im-
mediately.
"When I was a young boy I
heard some anti-Semitic
anecdotes about how Jews
like to talk, not to listen to
one another. Unfortunately,
we find some of this in our
society.
"Politicians, journalists —
they are in a hurry to com-

ment on events, to speak very
clearly, but not to listen to
one another, not to under-
stand the arguments of the
other side."
Looking at the national
unity coalition of the Likud
and Labour parties, he says,
is not always to witness an
exercise in "constructive col-
laboration."
"Sometimes it seems like
negotiations between two
sides in a war. We have all
the democratic institutions
and Israel is a frank and
open 'society from that point
of view. But it is not enough
to speak frankly. There must
also be real dialogue.
"And in a society that is as
complicated as Israeli society,
the-dialogue must be very in-
tense. As it is, I think there
is a lack of dialogue in all di-
rections."
The Shcharansky show is
still packing them in, and
may continue to do so for
some time yet. But what does
a symbol do when attention
starts to wane? More pre-
cisely, what does Anatoly
Shcharansky, now 38, plan to
do with the rest of his life?
"I don't have an answer
yet. I might try to go back to
my profession — programm-
ing computers with artificial
intelligence," he says without
conviction. "The problem is
that the whole science is just
25 years old and I have been
away from it for almost 15
years.
"I think I can perhaps do
some modest research, but if
I can find something more in-
teresting and if I think I can
be useful, I will do something
different.

Of Psalms And
Observance

Smehow
Natan
Shcharansky managed to
keep a small book of
Psalms in Hebrew with
him during his imprison-
ment. Asked which were
his favorites, he cited
Psalm 27, which begins:
"The Lord is my light and
my salvation; whom shall
I fear? The Lord is the
strength of my life; of
whom shall I be afraid?"
The passage he noted re-
citing repeatedly was
verse 10: "When my father
and my mother forsake
me, then the Lord will
take me up."
He also found comfort in
the best known of the 150
Psalms, the 23rd, which
states: "Yea, though I
walk through the valley of
the shadow of death, I will
fear no evil, for Thou art
with me."

When an Israeli reporter
in Washington told
Shcharansky she was glad
to see he was not wearing
a kippah, congratulating
him for resisting pressures
from the Orthodox to wear
one, he asserted that it is
a symptom of the level of
religious prejudice in Is-
rael to assume that the
observant Jews are trying
to pressure him to become
more observant. He said
that this was not the case
and that when a
Lubavitch representative
at Kennedy Airport placed
a kippah on Shcharansky's
head, an Orthodox friend
removed it and told the
former refusenik: "You are
a free man now. Don't let
anyone force you to do
something you don't want
to do."

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