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December 19, 1986 - Image 109

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-12-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

REAL ESTATE

OBITUARIES

FOR SALE

BLOOMFIELD HILLS
SCHOOLS

Funeral Chapel Founder
Ira Kaufman Dies At 90

THE
AMAZING
MARKET
PLACE

Lovely W. Bloom-
field 4 bedroom,
2 1/2 bath Tudor.
Super location! Great
value! Quality
home! Family room,
library. Area of much
more expensive
homes.. Mciny special
features. $227, 500.
Call now and

Ask For
MARY KEOLEIAN

m•
: Rind Bantu One

851-1900 or 626-6482

FARMINGTON
HILLS

HILLS OF
HUNTER'S POINTE

Ira Kaufman

We've de-classified the name of our
huge classified section to call it what
it really is: THE AMAZING MARKET-
PLACE of budget-priced saleables and
services. For information how you can
advertise to _alme,t
j b
- 4-60b0.
..isacty-3

New spacious 3,000
sq. ft. custom de-
signed two story
Tudor. Four bed-
rooms, 2 1/2 baths,
great room,
library,
, •
t luny
extras. $249,500.

CAMBRIDGE
HOMES, INC.

474-1250

BLOOMFIELD HILLS
SCHOOLS

1

Lovely warm home.
Kitchen with all
newer appliances &
floor. Roof 2 years
old. Burglar alarm
system. Many extras.
LOE 88816

2708 LONE PINE

N. side of Lone Pine,
E. of Middlebelt

Ask for KATHLEEN DEANE
RALPH MANUEL
ASSOC.

647-7100

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SELL IT FAST

In Our
Amazing Marketplace

354-6060

THE JEWISH NEWS

.

- ()until rig nis

funeral chapel in. 1940, Mr.
Kaufman had been a
milkman, pharmacy school
student and hardware store
employee. He acquired his
knowledge of the funeral
business after having worked
for the Hebrew Benevolent
Society, the community-
sponsored burial society.
Although he retired, Mr:
Kaufman kept in frequent •
touch with the activities of
the business.

,

Scientists To Help
Alcoholic Fruit Trees

OPEN SUN. 1-4

There's
Hidden Money
In Your
Closet!

Ira Kaufman, founder of
the funeral chapel which
bears his name, died Dec. 17
at age 90.
Born in Austria, Mr.
Kaufman came. to the U.S. _in

Among his professional af-
filiations, Mr. Kaufman in-
cluded the National Funeral
Directors Association, Michi-
gan Funeral Directors Asso-
ciation, District I of the
Michigan Association of
Jewish Funeral Directors of
which he was a past
president and the Jewish
Funeral Directors of America
of which he also was a past
president.
In the Jewish community,
Mr. Kaufman was a member
of Pisgah Lodge of B'nai
B'rith, Perfection Lodge of
the Masons, Zionist Organ-
ization of America, Hannah
Schloss Old Timers, Jewish
National Fund and the Allied
Jewish Campaign.
Mr. Kaufman held mem-
berships at Temple Beth El
and Cong. Beth Abraham
Hillel Moses but was a life
member of Cong. Shaarey
Zedek and head of the ushers
committee for many years.
of his devo-
tion to Jewiso. comm U 1.10. 1
causes, Mr. Kaufman re-
ceived the Prime Minister's
Medal from State of Israel
Bonds and a resolution of
appreciation from Temple
Beth El.
Mr. Kaufman is survived
by his wife, Rose; a son, Her-
bert; two daughters, Mrs.
Gerald (Jean) Sucher and
Mrs. Nathan (Charlotte)
Feldman; 14 grandchildren
and 12 great-grandchildren.

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Jerusalem — Israeli scien-
tists at Hebrew University
say there is hope for alcoholic
trees, that is, trees that pro-
duce alcohol in their roots,
due to lack of air in the soil,
when waterlogged from flood-
ing.
Apple, peach and apricot
trees are particularly suscep-
tible to waterlogging, says
Prof. Arye Gur of the univer-
sity's Faculty of Agriculture,
creating alcohol which
travels to and damages the
trees' branches, foliage and
fruit.
More resistant trees, how-
ever, produce less alcohol and
instead more malic acid,
which is harmless to them.
Prof. Gur has been able to
successfully imitate the
natural processes of these
more resistant trees; he
treats regular apple and
peach trees with chemical
growth regulators and
enzyme inhibitors that effec-
tively block alcohol forma-
tion. The chemical inhibitors
can be applied by the fruit
farmer in the irrigation
water; three applications
have been found to be suffi-
cient.
A related method of treat-
ing waterlogged trees that
drop their fruit before it is
sufficiently developed, is the

direct injection of chemicals
into the trunks of ailing
trees. This treatment resulted
in a 22 percent increase in
yield. The chemicals also im-
proved tree vigor and fruit
size of both peach and apple
trees.

Coexistence
Stressed

New York — In an effort to
improve Jewish-Arab rela-
tions within Israel, the Na-
tional Council of Jewish
Women (NCJW) Research In-
stitute for Innovation in Edu-
cation at The Hebrew Uni-
versity of Jerusalem has in-
troduced a new project,
"Rules of the Game," aimed
at familiarizing Jewish and
Arab youths with the con-
cepts of democracy.
According to Professor
Chaim Adler, Director of the
NCJW Research Institute,
Jewish and Arab educators
first will work together in
this two-stage project to de-
velop a curriculum for demo-
cratic coexistence. During
stage two, the teachers will
implement the program in
their respective schools by in-
troducing the concept of
democracy.

109

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