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December 12, 1986 - Image 50

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-12-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WARNING

I .L.

RELIGION

THESE PREMISES PROTECTED BY

THE
PROTECTION
SOLUTION

Who's A Jew?

Continued from preceding page

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50

Friday, December 12, 1986 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

work, argued for a Jewish
presence on the show as well.
By going on the show to
oppose (Stone and Jacobs),
and either doing well or not
so well, at least people will
know that there is an opposi-
tion and there is a Jewish
viewpoint," Batya explained.
Rabbi David Nelson of
Cong. Beth Shalom was ini-
tially contacted by the Coun-
cil to be the show's Jewish
participant. He declined, be-
lieving that his presence
would be counterproductive.
"What do we gain by it?
We sit there as equals. They
(`Christian Jews') are not
equal. They're fraudulant.
Why give a fraudulent view
credibility?"
The Jewish seat on the
stage was eventually filled by
Rabbi Tolwin.
The Nov. 11 show received
a ratings share of 42, Kelly &
Company's Hurtado said,
meaning that 42 percent of
those watching TV at that
hour were tuned to Kelly &
Company. November was also
a sweeps month, when sta-
tions determine their adver-
tising rates according to the
ratings their programs re-
ceive.
Hurtado denied, however,
that "Christian Jews" is the
kind of "sexy" topic that a
program producer would use
to boost his ratings, "al-
though people always love to
hear a debate."
The day following the pro-

gram, at a meeting of the
Rabbinical Commission, local
rabbis recommended the ap-
pointment of a task force on
missionaries and cults.
Whether this task force will
be organized by the commis-
sion or by the Jewish Com-
munity Council has not yet
been determined. The rabbis
also considered sermonizing
on the topic and spoke of the
need of improving Jewish
education, according to Gale,
who attended the meeting.
Missionaries like Stone and
Jacobs prey upon those es-
tranged from or lacking
knowledge of Judaism. In tes-
timony before the Rabbinical
Commission, Batya Schreiber
noted:
"Special emphasis has been
placed (by the missionaries)
on reaching out to some of
the 'forgotten' elements in
our community — the young,
the handicapped, especially
the Jewish deaf, the inter-
married, the bereaved, the
elderly and the Russian Jews
in our midst. The apostates
are adept at pinpointing and
preying on the weakest links
in our communal chain."
Miriam Schey, Jewish
Community Council commu-
nity affairs associate, notes
that the problem of mis-
sionaries is a part of the gen-
eral threat to Jews posed by
assimilation. "As we grow
more assimilated, over time
we are increasingly suscepti-
ble," she said.

Continued on Page 52

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