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December 12, 1986 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-12-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ANALYSIS

THE JEWISH

WELFARE FEDERATION
and
THE JEWISH NEWS
INVITE CHILDREN OF ALL AGES
TO PARTICIPATE IN A

KB% Mr. S ociLTY

Year Of The Spy

Continued from Page 1

IVIED 11CULEW
51304a144-ftLy seizvite
51t4M HisptrAL

F I

Theme:

We Are One: Partners for Life
What Our Jewish Community Means to Me

SIZE: No smaller than 8 x 10; no larger than 11 x 14.
MEDIUM: Anything that shows up bold, such as crayons, paint, cut paper,
material. No pencils or light blue crayons, please. We suggest taping work on
to cardboard to protect it. Do not fold. To qualify, an entry form must be

taped to the back!

PRIZES: GRAND PRIZE: $250; FIRST PRIZE: $50 U.S. Savings Bond.
Prizes will be awarded in all categories (5 to 18). Winners will appear in

The Jewish News.

DEADLINE: Monday, December 15, 1986.

TO ENTER: All work must be received at The Jewish News office,
20300 Civic Center Dr., Suite 240, Southfield 48076. All work must have
an entry form attached to the back. Enclose a self-addressed, stamped
envelope if you want your work returned to you.

ENTRY FORM

Age

Name

Phone

Address

State

City

Zip

Parents' Names

School

Yes, return my work

No, do not return my work

30 Friday, December 12, 1986 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

flirted with the Anglican
Church in the Arab town of
Ramallah, then embraced
Communism and the Pales-
tinian cause?
How could they miss the
fact that Vanunu was the
same man who, as a student
in the small town of Beer-
sheba. insisted on taking his
clothes off at student parties
in order to prove that he had
the "guts to do it."
How could they miss the
bulky 35mm camera he car-
ried through the tight securi-
ty screen at the Dimona
plant, take photographs in-
side, then smuggle the film
out of the country — landing
in Moscow a few days later on
his way to Australia?
These questions will never
be answered. At least, not
publicly. But it is precisely
such questions that are caus-
ing eyebrows to arch so acute-
ly. For they demonstrate
what can, at best, be de-
scribed as a major intelli-
gence lapse; one that reflects
badly on a branch of the in-
dustry that has long been
regarded as a market leader.
But the Vanunu affair,
damaging as it might be to
Israel's security interests and
to the reputation of its in-
telligence services, is only one
of a series of security affairs
that have come badly un-
stuck recently, and — worst

nightmare of all for a
spymaster — been exposed to
the full glare of public
scrutiny.
In fact, 1986 will probably
be remembered in Israel's
history books as the "Year of
the Spy." Over the past year,
give or take a few months:
• United States Customs
officials have charged that
Israel attempted to illegally
acquire classified technology
for extending the life of tank
gun barrels.
• A United States "sting"
snared a clutch of Israelis, led
by a retired army general,
who were attempting to sell
more than $2 billion worth of
U.S. weapons to Iran. They
are still in prison awaiting
trial.
• United States investi-
gators discovered an Israeli
"plot" to smuggle out
krytrons, high-speed elec-
tronic switching devices that
can act as triggers for nuclear
weapons.
• Israel was alleged to have
illegally acquired the tech-
nology for making cluster
bombs, a classified weapon
that the U.S. had previously
denied to Jerusalem.
• A 32-year-old American
Jew, Jonathan Jay Pollard,
was arrested outside the
Israeli Embassy in Washing-
ton after being turned away
when he applied for asylum.

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