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December 12, 1986 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-12-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



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CAPTURE THE
HOLIDAY SPIRIT
AT EUROPEAN MOTORS

LET YOUR EMOTIONS
CARRY YOU AWAY

YOUR INTELLECT
WON'T BE FAR BEHIND.

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Kosher

Continued from Page 18

prices and encourages more
people to keep kosher."
While the Council is "very
happy" with the existing
suppliers, it would be "very
happy to see more," he adds.
However, not at the expense
of lower quality, which some
believe would be the result of
allowing more out-of-town
suppliers to sell here.
Even if high quality,
lower-priced beef sources
could be obtained by the
kosher consumer, the na-
tional trends away from beef
consumption and toward fish
and poultry promise to keep
volume low and production
costs high. U.S. Department
of Agriculture statistics show
annual per capita beef con-
sumption dropped from an
average of 94.4 pounds in
1976 to 78 pounds in 1984.
While the Detroit area
kosher beef consumer should
not expect to see lower prices,
enhanced supervision by the

Council should help assure he
is getting what he is paying a
premium for. ❑

Safer In Israel

Cleveland (JTA) — Mayor
George Voinovich is not
likely to get a warm welcome
home when he returns to city
hall from a visit to Israel to-
day. Citizens of Cleveland,
local officials and the press
are far from pleased with the
remark His Honor dropped at
a Tel Aviv press conference
Monday to the effect that, de-
spite Israel's history of war
and terrorist assaults, he –(
feels "safer here than in some
neighborhoods in my city."
He explained later that he
meant "I feel as safe in Israel
as I do at home, in my own
city."

Legal Status

tar ;ragidlittak

IF YOU'RE LOOKING FOR THE MERCEDES
WE EITHER HAVE IT OR CAN FIND IT.

EUROPEAN AUTO SERVICE, LTD.

21425 Woodward, Ferndale

20

Friday, December 12, 1986 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

399 - 3130/31

Three legal battles have
been threatened or started
during 1986 because of
kashrut-related issues in
Detroit.
• Bernard Rayber of
Bernard and Son Kosher
Meats in Farmington Hills
threatened to file suit
against the Council of Or-
thodox Rabbis over the re-
moval of its certification
from his store this summer.
A mashgiach allegedly
found non-kosher meat in
the store and a private in-
vestigator reportedly saw
meat-like packages being
loaded
into
Rayber's
stationwagon at his
brother's non-kosher busi-
ness in Hamtramck.
Rayber is continuing to
sell kosher meat without
supervision or certification.
He told The Jewish News
this week that "nothing has
changed yet. I was going to
sue" the Council of Or-
thodox Rabbis, but his doc-
tor told him not to do any-
thing right now because of
his health. Rayber under-
went heart bypass surgery
recently.
• As a result of the
Rayber case, three me _ n on
behalf of the Council sued
the Michigan Department of
Agriculture to compel the
department to enforce
Michigan's kosher food law.
Representatives of both
sides met last week, and are
working on a new law to be
presented to the Legisla-
ture.
"We are in a very seri-
ous stage of negotiation and
feel we can resolve it with-
out litigation," said attorney
Eli Kaplan. The meeting
last week in Lansing was
attended by Kaplan; Dr.

E.G. Heffron, head of the
Agriculture Department's
Food Division; Assistant At-
torney General David
Silver; and Rabbi Sholem
Rubin, head of the Kosher
Enforcement Division for
the State of New York.
Heffron and Kaplan
said the two sides are look-
ing at kosher food laws in
New York, New Jersey,
Florida and California. The
current Michigan kosher
law does not mention
enforcement, and without
such a provision and specific
funding from the legisla-
ture, Heffron said, the Ag-
riculture Department feels
its hands are tied.
Heffron said no time
frame has been established
to come up with proposed
legislation, "but I'm sure
with their enthusiasm it
will move quickly."
• Rabbi David Neren-
berg, owner, of the now-
closed Lincoln Kosher
Meats in Lincoln Center in
Oak Park, filed a $1.5 mil-
lion law suit against Sinai
Hospital and several of its
staff, the Kollel Institute
and the Council of Orthodox
Rabbis, alleging discrimina-
tion in Sinai's refusal to do
business with him.
The suit has been
transfered from Wayne
County Circuit Court to
Federal District Court in
Detroit and attorney Bill
Winsten, representing
Sinai, does not believe the
case will go to trial for at
least a year.
Attorney Steven Cohen,
representing the Council,
has a motion pending before
Judge Lawrence Zatkoff
asking that his clients be
dismissed from the case. ❑

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