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December 05, 1986 - Image 36

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-12-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WARNING

NEWS

THESE PREMISES PROTECTED BY

Eliahu Essas

Our Middle Name
Says It All!

Continued from preceding page

i n, AL ASIk

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36

Friday, December 5, 1986

Daily 10:00-5, Thurs. till 8
Saturday 11 00-3 00

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

352-8622

Rabbi Eliahu Essas in Detroit Tuesday: Real hope lies in a
long-term understanding with the Soviets.

Soviet Jews. Without quiet
diplomacy there can be no
negotiations and no agree-
ments signed.
"Enormous public pressure
can bring out one Jew; quiet
diplomacy can bring out one
Jew. A combination can bring
out thousands."
Real hope for Soviet Jews,
he went on to say, "lies in a
strategic long-term under-
standing with the Soviet
Union."
He cautioned that Soviet
Jews are human beings, not
pawns. They must be
encouraged, with visits, with

letters. "Every letter arrives
in the Soviet Union, without
exception," he stated. Even if
letters fall into the hands of
the KGB it is worthwhile to
write them because, ".44 cents
and you can invest in this
KGB head that somebody
cares about this Jew."
His day-long visit to De-
troit was sponsored by the
Jewish Community Council
of Metropolitan Detroit,
Friends of the Soviet Jewry
Education and Information
Center and Rabbi E.B.
Friedman of Yeshivath Beth
Yehudah.

Court Refuses To Hear
Ex-Nazi's Appeal

New York (JTA) — The
Supreme Court refused last
Monday to hear an appeal by
Nazi war criminal Karl Lin-
nas against deportation to
the Soviet Union where he
was convicted and sentenced
to death in absentia for par-
ticipating in the mass mur-
ders of Jews and others at a
concentration camp in Tartu,
Estonia, during World War
II.
Linnas, 66, was charged by
the Justice Department's Of-
fice of Special Investigations
(OSI) with lying about his
wartime activities when he
came here in 1951 from Ger-
many under the Displaced
Persons Act of 1941. He
became a U.S. citizen in 1960.
The Justice Department said
he will • be deported to the
USSR, the only country that
will accept him.
According to the charges,
Linnas joined a Nazi execu-
tion squad in 1941 when Ger-
many occupied Estonia, the
purpose of which was to ex-
terminate "undesirables,"
mostly Jews. He is accused of
commanding firing squads
that killed men, women and
children forced to kneel before
mass graves and of personal-
ly shooting several inmates,

The Supreme Court deci-
sion was hailed by Jewish
organizations, Holocaust sur-
vivor groups and political
figures. Brooklyn District At-
torney Elizabeth Holtzman,
who as a New York Con-
gresswoman sponsored
legislation that allows depor-
tation of Nazi war criminals,
congratulated the OSI "for
its untiring efforts to bring
Linnas to justice.
"I am particularly pleased
by the Supreme Court's ac-
tion because Linnas claimed
that the law I wrote to pre-
vent the United States from
providing haven for Nazi
killers, the so-called Holtz-
man Amendment, was uncon-
stitutional. Linnas mocked
U.S. justice by arguing that
he should be deported to the
Estonian Consulate, the New
York City headquarters of the
former government of Eston-
ia," Holtzman said.
Eli Rosenbaum, World
Jewish Congress general
counsel and former OSI pro-
secutor, said, "There was an
unconscionable delay for 19
years in commencing legal
proceedings" and that "at
long last, the day for which
we have waited 25 years has
arrived."

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