100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

November 28, 1986 - Image 38

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-11-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

C heir-praxis' 6

means

Chiropractic is a natural healing method. Working with our hands we
restore normal nerve, muscle and joint mechanics allowing the body to heal itself.
Troubled with headache, neckache, backache, stiffness, or tension?
Relief is close by. Chiropractic can help! . . . and most insurance plans cover our care.

Stuart A. Firsten, D.C.

Birchwood Medical Building

PROFILE

with the hands '

Continued from preceding page .

350-3510

call
for a free consultation

Chiropractic Physician

26771 W. Twelve Mile Suite 102 Southfield

Omri

( Two Blocks west of Northwestern )

Advertising in The Jewish News Gets Results
Place Your Ad Today. Call 354-6060

CUSTOM HOLIDAY FASHION

Let us Create A Dazzling New Look For
You! - Start Your New Year Off Right With
Custom Fashion Extraordinaire From
Pamela Swift

CALL FOR YOUR COMPLIMENTARY CONSULTATION



PAN ALA SWIT, LTD.
P ine fake

4375 Orckara Lake

-

00c1 at



Omri Kaufman: "There is an attitude that Israelis are very tough,
very honest. I learned here a phrase, 'earthy,' very earthy."

MOW

Lone Pine

Wesi eioomFieu, vl 48033

custom fashion designs • expert alterations on premises

(31 3

855-0760

Office
Supply Center

Jimmie & Sheila:
Getting set to help
you in any way they
can for a happy-healthy
Holiday Season

Nita:
The best when it comes

to helping you select
just the "right" gift

Andi, Annie & Connie:
Getting ready
to fill your
phone orders

Gemini II 28400 Twelve Mile, Southfield, Mich. 48034 • 353-3355
Gemini 1 10600 Galaxie, Ferndale, Mich. 48220 • 399-9830

38

Friday, November 28, 1986 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Cindy:
Paper by the lb.
— she will do
imprinting
while you wait

Americanized, with Tiger
baseball pennants perched
next to the flag of Israel.
Dressed in floppy sweat
clothes with medium-long
hair, Omri could easily pass
for any American teen, ex-
cept for the Hebrew writing
on his grey sweatshirt. He
speaks accented but good
English, which he has
studied for about ten years.
"He has a wonderful sense
of humor," adds Marge Mel-
len, "and seems to be able to
handle almost any situation.
I think that very nice friend-
ships have arisen with all
three of our kids."
Omri cannot say enough
about the Mellens, expressing
his, "very, very warm feel-
ings," for the entire family.
He says they have made him
feel at home in West Bloom-
field, and refers to them as
his family, calling Mike, for
example, "my brother, here."
Omri is used to answering
questions by now. He re-
sponds thoughtfully, and is
careful not to generalize
about the U.S., admitting
that he has seen only a small
part of the country. He did
sum up the feelings of non-
Jewish Americans toward Is-
raelis.
"There is the kind of an
attitude towards Israelis that
they are tough, very tough,
very honest. I learned here a
phrase, 'earthy,' very earthy.
Very straight. Friendly,
maybe."
Omri talked to Israelis
familiar with the U.S. before
he arrived for the first time
last year, but still found
many surprises. He was im-
pressed by the forests of Ore-
gon, the Pacific Ocean and
the Mississippi River near
Memphis. He also visited
Washington, D.C., which,
"impressed me very much. It
was very exciting to go to all
the memorials and to be in
the White House and to go
all over.
"I remember when I came,"

he continued. "I was sur-
prised, I was amazed by the
size of the cars. When I came
to New York, to see all those
tall buildings, it was amaz-
ing. Maybe here I was sur-
prised to see — again, maybe
because I am in West Bloom-
field, I understand it's kind of
a wealthy neighborhood —
but I saw so many kids with
cars.
"I think it was difficult for
me to understand why can't I
go (to) downtown Detroit. I
was 'amazed to see the
amount of crime that I see
every morning in the Detroit
News, when I read it. It's
really scary. And when I see
the small kids that were kid-
napped — on the milk boxes
— it's really frustrating.
Also adorning. Omri's walls
are views of Israel, his home
city of Haifa, and photos of
friends from home. He has a
large box in his dresser, stuf-
fed with letters from friends
and family in Israel.
"Although I have a great
time here, I enjoy every min-
ute here, I get a letter here,
get a letter there, and I get a
little bit homesick," he ad-
mits. "Part of my enjoyment
here is only because I know
that in Israel I have some-
where to come back to, and
my friends waiting for me ...
(and) my girlfriend. I love her
very, very much."
"And (I) miss my lan-
guage," he continues. "I'm
able to communicate with
you now, but still, I don't feel
free with it.
"I live in Haifa, so I miss
the view of the Mediterra-
nean Sea from my window,
and I miss the freedoms that
we have in Israel and the re-
lationships with people."
What does he mean by
`freedoms we have in Israel,'
that he does not have here?
Aside from adjustment to life
in the U.S., he notes an
example; "My hobby in Israel
is hitchiking with my friends.
You can't do it in America.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan