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November 21, 1986 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-11-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,•5

• .1.

it A 4

1 /2
OFF!

NEWS

Soviet Jew Decides
To Return To Russia

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Atlanta (JTA) — The deci-
sion by a Soviet Jewish
emigre living here to return to
the Soviet Union has startled
the organized Jewish com-
munity.
Yuri Chapovsky, 27, an-
nounced at a recent press con-
ference that he was returning
to the Soviet Union because
his hopes for a better life were
not fulfilled in America.
Chapovsky came to the
United States in 1979 with
his parents and younger
brother.
With him at the press con-
ference, conducted by the
Soviet Information Office in
Washington, D.C., were three
other Soviet emigres wishing
to return including another
Jew, Israel Glickman of
Dallas.
Conversations here with
friends of Chapovsky's fami-
ly and Jewish communal
workers who helped him in-
dicated that his departure
was psychologically, not
politically, motivated.
Described as extremely
bright, especially in math-
ematics, Chapovsky also was
portrayed as troubled, unhap-
py and disatisfied for some
time.
"I think he has some prob-
lems, and I don't think the
United States is one of them,"
said a source close to the
family. "I think maybe it's
just personal problems. We
don't feel he's thinking
straight."
His family, which lives in
the Atlanta area, reportedly
is distraught over Yuri's deci-
sion. They have been unavail-
able to the media, and family
friends are protecting their
privacy. Those friends who
spoke with the reporters did
so anonymously. Jewish com-
munal workers and officials
also were reluctant to corn-
ment on the case, adhering to
a policy of client confiden-
tiality.
However, a Jewish com-
munal source said Chapovsky
worked part-time in Atlanta
in 1983 after receiving a
master's degree in applied
mathematics at the Georgia
Institute of technology. Dur-
ing the press conference,
Chapovsky said that despite
the degree, he was unable to
find a job.
But a former professor at
the institute, John Wallace,
questioned Chapovsky's in-
ability to find a job. "Even
the worst students get at
least one job offer, and the
good students get several
very lucrative job offers," he
said in a telephone interview.
Chapovsky made the insti-
tute's dean's list several
times, according to institute
spokesman Charles Harmon.
The Jewish communal
source also disclosed that
after obtaining the master's •
degree, Chapovsky studied in
- France toward his Ph.D., and ,

there, as in the U.S., he was
"unhappy and dissatisfied."
He left France without com-
pleting his studies, and when
he returned here "he was
pretty much determined that
the United States was not for
him either," said the source.
Soviet emigres often have
trouble adjusting to the
"radically different" life in
America, according to Leonard
Cohen, executive director of
the Jewish Family Service
here. Some Soviet emigres
can't shake the idea of having
a niche provided by society.
But most, including Chapov-
sky's family, adapt just fine.
"Of the 600 Soviet refugees
we have resettled in Atlanta
since 1973, this is the first
overt situation that I'm
aware of in which an in-
dividual has actually chosen
to go back to Russia," Cohen
said.
That's also the case, nation-
wide, according to a State
Department official who
spoke anonymously. The of-
ficial said the Soviets have in-
tensified their campaign to
convince their citizens that
life in the West is problematic
and that many former So-
viets now in the West are
dissatisfied.

Hungarian Jews
Remember The
Revolution

London (JTA) — Thirty
years ago, on November 4,
1956, some 200,000 Hungar-
ians began fleeing their coun-
try after Soviet tanks
smashed the 13-day revolu-
tion against StaliniSt oppres-
sion. No fewer than 20,000 of
the refugees were Jews,
representing about a fifth of
the Hungarian Jews who had
survived the Nazi Holocaust
a decade earlier.
Paradoxically, though,
many of those against whom
the revolution was directed
were themselves Jews. Mat-
yas Rakoski, Hungary's
tyrannical dictator, was one
of a Jewish foursome who ran
is affairs. His colleagues were
Erno Gero, the economic
overlord; Mihaly Farkas, in
charge of security; and Jozsef
Revai, the chief cultural
commisar.
Nine of the 25 members of
the Hungarian Communist
Party's first Central Commit-
tee were Jews, most of whom
had spent the war in Moscow
and re-entered Hungary in
the wake of the victorious
Red Army.
The hated political police,
against whom the revolution
vented much of its wrath, was
commanded by Gabor Peter,
a former tailor, and included
many other Jews among its
-
Ttommanders:.
.
' It was these- , people who
"had staff the Stalinist show

64:





3'

"

.

,

2' Friday,N64eVriber 21, 1986 THE 'DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

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