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November 14, 1986 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-11-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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CLOSE-UP

EUROPEAN MOTORS
HAS ONE UNDERLYING
PURPOSE...TO HELP
MEN AND WOMEN
ACHIEVE MORE,
WHILE DRIVING.

Progress

Continued from Preceding Page

We have set goals
country.
and priorities, and there is no
fuzziness regarding our mis-
sion, but it's a good business
principle to have a mission
statement and strategic plan
to help us set up parameters
and I'd like to see us move
along those lines," says Giles.
It is for those same reasons
that he hopes to commission
a demographic study.
Giles acknowledges that the
new tax laws may "make
philanthropy more expen-
sive," but he is confident that
the Allied Jewish Campaign,
which has always managed to •
raise more money each suc-
cessive year, will continue to

do so because people recog-
nize the needs. "I don't plan
out of reaction or pessimism,"
he said. "We are capable of
giving more."
His ongoing project will be
human resource development
because "we will live or die
not just by raising money but
by attracting the best lay
leadership." He is well aware
that volunteerism is decreas-
ing — "it's still alive and
well but skinnier" — and
says Federation will have to
be "more planful" in attract-
ing young people because "if
we don't get them when
they're young, we won't get
them." ❑

To Our
Advertisers

There will be early deadlines for our November 28 edition.

All display advertising reservations must be made by Friday,
November 21 at 4:30 p.m.

Classified advertising reservations must be made by Monday,
November 24 at 3 p.m.

The Jewish News offices will be closed November 27-28 in ob-
servance of Thanksgiving.

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16

Friday, November 14, 1986 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Yad Vashem Honors
Righteous Gentiles

New York — Delegates to
the American Jewish Con-
gress 1986 Biennial Conven-
tion in Israel recently dedi-
cated a tree-planning site at
Yad Vashem, to honor a
German woman who, with
her husband, a German army
major, helped save the lives
of hundreds of Jews from the
Nazis.
The woman, the late
Donata Helmrich, has just
been added to the list of
Righteous Gentiles. Later
this year, a tree will be
planted in her name on the
Avenue of the Righteous
Gentiles adjacent to the
memorial. Her husband, the
late Maj. Eberhard Helmrich,
was honored at Yad Vashem
in 1968.
Among those who attended
the dedication ceremony were
Susi Bezalel and Moshe
Zamir who were saved by the
Helmrichs. Both now live in
Israel.
Before World War II, the
Helmriches were instrumen-
tal in hiding Jews when the
Nazis rampaged through the
streets of Germany, attacking
Jews and destroying their
property. They also aided
Jewish families in fleeing the
country.
When war broke out, Maj.
Helmrich, an agricultural ex-
pert, was commissioned a
major in the quartermaster
corps in Galicia, Poland
where he is credited with
saving at least 300 Jews in
1942 and 1943.
Maj. Helmrich was placed
in charge of a farm, produc-

ing food for German troops.
The farm employed 250 to
300 Jewish prisoners as
laborers. Using a variety of
ruses, the officer, then in his
40s, managed to protect his
workers during periodic ak-
tions when the SS demanded
that he turn over quotas of
Jews for extermination.
Maj. Helmrich's response to
each request was to persuade
the SS that the loss of work-
ers would seriously impair
the farm's operation and lead
to a severe shortage of food
for German troops. He also
bribed Gestapo agents to
keep them quiet.
At the same time, Mrs.
Helmrich, who remained in
Berlin, helped her husband
set up an "underground rail-
road" for Polish Jewish
women. The German officer
saved the lives of at least 100
Jewish girls by having papers
forged identifying them as
Polish Christians. He also ar-
ranged for transit documents,
enabling them to travel to
Berlin where Mrs. Helmrich
secured positions for them as
domestics in German house-
holds.

Coexistence
Promoted

New York — Religious ex-
tremism in Israel, and the
peaceful coexistence of widely
differing ideological groups
will be analyzed at a three
day seminary in Jerusalem,
March 10-12.

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