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October 17, 1986 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Ben-Gurion

Anniversary

Page 79

THIS ISSUE 50c

SERVING DETROIT'S JEWISH COMMUNITY

EWS

OCTOBER 17, 1986 / 14 TISHREI 5747

Wiesel Shares Nobel
`With All Survivors'

ELSA SOLENDER

Contributing Editor

New York — A few hours after
it was announced on Tuesday that
the recipient of the 1986 Nobel
Peace Prize was Elie Wiesel, the
honoree said the prize was not his
alone. Speaking at a press confer-
ence, Wiesel said the prize also be-
longs to his fellow survivors of the
Holocaust, those who have "given an
example to humankind of how not to
succumb to despair even though de-
spair -is often justified."
Wiesel characterized himself as
"a Jew profoundly committed to
Jewish tradition, Jewish religion
and the Jewish people."
As a Jew, he said, he could still
speak words that have meaning for
non-Jews, words he called "gestures
or offerings."
"The more Jewish I am, the
more • Christian a Christian will be,"
he said.
Wiesel called the Nobel Peace
Prize, The highest prize that exists
in the world."
Asked if he would have pre-
ferred the Nobel literary award,
Wiesel said, "Literature that does

Envoy Sees
Progress

Staff Report

The risks of making Middle East
peace are real, but the status quo is
far riskier, a State Department offi-
cial told a Detroit audience Tuesday.
David M. Satterfield, political-
military officer in the Office of Israel
and Arab-Israeli Affairs, told 60
members of the Zionist Organization
of America-Metro Detroit District,
that the areas of agreement between
the U.S. and Israel are currently far
greater than the areas in which the
two countries differ. Also, the dif-
ferences between the U.S. and some
Arab states, particularly Jordan,
have narrowed. These and other fac-
tors make the present "a unique
period in the Middle East," he said.

Continued on Page 23

Elie Wiesel:
"Profoundly committed."

not serve peace is not my kind of lit-
erature. Literature is an instrument
for peace."
He said that the prize will not
change his life except to heighten
his sense of responsibility. "Respon-
sibility is the key word. If not, the
prize itself is futile and meaning-
less."
He believes the new attention
he is receiving will enable him to
speak louder for the same causes
and be heard by more people.
Wiesel embraced a friend as he
made his way through an applaud-
ing crowd to a podium at the 92nd
Street YM & YWHA for his first ex-
perience after learning of his honor.
The friend was M. Bloch,, president
of the World Federation of Bergen-
Belsen Survivors and advisor to the

Continued on Page 24

Amazing Marketplace
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Births ...
Business ....... .. . .....

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84

85
86
59
111

Engagements
Entertainment
Obituaries
Singles ...... ....... ....... 92
40
Synagogues

Women

51

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