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October 10, 1986 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Jewish Community Council

DELEGATE ASSEMBLY

HIGH HOLY DAYS

Celebrating

Continued from preceding page

A LIVING HISTORY
IN TRIBUTE
TO
AMERICAN JEWISH POETESS
EMMA LAZARUS

by

JUDY GOLDSTEIN

Wednesday, October 22, 1986
8:00 P.M.
United Hebrew Schools
Auditorium

21550 W. Twelve Mile Rd.
Southfield

Leon S. Cohan, presiding

splIZER

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Spitzer
and Mr. & Mrs. Avrohom Plotnik
would like to wish everyone a
Happy New Year.

Of Harvard Row

THE LARGEST HEBREW BOOK SHOP. IN THE MIDWEST

We Have High Holiday
MACHZORIM

For All Synagogues

In The Detroit Metropolitan Area

Just Arrived

ISRAELI
Esrogim & Lulovim

at reasonable prices

Super Special

• 1

I
I
I
I

6 Doz. Israeli Dripless

I
I
I

249

I

CANDLES

I

I

1

Exp. 10/27/86

1611•111••

$

good with
coupon only

■ 111111M111111111111•11111111MIIIIMIMININNIMMEM1111111111111111 1 1

SPITZER'S

26

Friday, October 10, 1986

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Hebrew Book & Gift Center

11 Mile & Lahser, Southfield

Harvard Row Mall

356-6080

open All Day Sunday

person withdrew a paper from
the containers being passed
around, and read it aloud.
These papers proved to be a
meaningful addition to the
list of sins in our mahzors. As
a participant in this new
custom, I felt a sense of re-
lease, and a sense of a new
beginning, when I saw all our
slips of paper burn and the
smoke rise into the night air
after a long day of fasting and
prayer.
Fasting is another aspect of
Yom Kippur that you can dis-
cuss with your child. He may
be surprised that there are
positive reasons for fasting,
that it isn't only a way of
punishing ourselves.
In The Jewish Kids
Catalog, (Jewish Publication
Society, Phila., 1983) Chaya
M. Burstein says, "Being
hungry makes us think of
people who don't have enough
food to eat and makes us
want to help them. The
Talmud says that after a per-
son eats and drinks he has
but one heart, for himself
alone. Before a person eats
and drinks (when he is fast-
ing) he has two hearts, one for
himself and one for all hungry
people."
Another reason for fasting
is to focus our minds on
spiritual thoughts and raise

our consciousness to that of
angels. As Ruth Kolodoy ex-
plains in The Book of Jewish
Holidays (Behrman House,
Inc., N.Y., 1981), we fast so
our minds "will be entirely
clear for praying and speak-
ing closely to God. We don't
want to take the time to eat,
and we don't want to spend
our energies on everyday
thoughts like food."

Traditionally, children un-
der thirteen don't have to
fast. However, by the age of
nine, children can skip a
snack or breakfast, or post-
pone a meal for an hour or
two, as a way of beginning to •
fast.
By talking to your child
about "teshuvah," about
fasting, about asking forgive-
ness, by reading him the story
of Jonah, and by encouraging
him to say he's sorry to some-
one he has wronged over the
year, you will help him
understand some of the con-
cepts behind this Day of
Atonement.
He will begin to understand
that the meaning of Yom Kip-
pur is not found in outside
symbols like a sukkah or mat-
zah. Rather, it is found inside
ourselves, in a process that
leads to inner growth and
change.

Israel Wants Peace
Shamir Tells UN

United Nations (JTA) —
Israeli Foreign Minister Yit-
zhak Shamir told the United
Nations last week that
"Israel remains anxious and
willing to move the peace pro-
cess forward without delay."
In an address to the Gen-
eral Assembly, Shamir cited
Israel's 1979 peace treaty with
Egypt which he said "was in-
tended to be the first in a
series of treaties that to-
gether would constitute a
comprehensive settlement of
the Arab-Israel conflict."
Shamir, who was scheduled
to take office as Prime
Minister upon his return to
Israel under the unity coali-
tion government's rotation of
power agreement, said, "We
turn again to the leaders of
our Arab neighbor with an
outstretched hand of peace.
Let us bring an end to belli-
gerency and hatred. Let us
make real the hopes for a new
era of understanding and
coexistence. We shall not
spare any effort in this quest.
Nor will we give up hope that
it will bear fruit."
Shamir observed pointedly
that Egypt, the only Arab
state to sign a peace_ treaty
with Israel, has benefitted by
it. "With its commitment to
the (Camp David) accords,
Egypt has gained its prestige

and stature. Many of those in
the Arab world who once at-
tacked and boycotted it are
now looking to Egypt to play
a leading role in peace
negotiations," Shamir said.
He appealed directly to
King Hussein of Jordan to
enter peace talks with Israel.
"We recognize that once it
decides to respond to our call,
Jordan may face considerable
opposition from some Arab
quarters. This opposition,
however, will not be deflected
or appeased by such devices
as an international con-
ference," Shamir said.
With respect to Soviet par-
ticipation in the Middle East
peace process, the Israeli
Foreign Minister reiterated
past statements by himself
and by Prime Minister
Shimon Peres that without
the resumption of diplomatic
relations with Israel and a
major change of policy
toward Soviet Jews, "it is dif-
ficult to see how the Soviet
Union could contribute."
Shamir devoted much of his
address to the major threats
facing Israel, the Middle East
and the civilized world from
terrorism, the escalation of
the conventional arms race in
the Middle East, the dangers
of unclear weapons and the
problem of chemical warfare.

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