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October 03, 1986 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CLOSE-UP

HAPPINESS • HEALTH • PEACE
TO ALL OUR CUSTOMERS
FRIENDS & FAMILY
HAPPY NEW YEAR

Judye Glazer & Leslie Cady

East Of Woodward

Continued from Page 16

01\QO
‘30

ORCHARD MALL 851-3333
EVERGREEN PLAZA 559-7770

WHAT'S AILING YOU?

This entitles you to:

Check this list.

❑ ARTHRITIS ❑ SINUS TROUBLE ❑ ARM AND SHOULDER PAIN
HEADACHES
7.3 FATIGUE ❑ LEG PAIN
DEPRESSION
❑ PAIN IN LOWER BACK ❑ PAINFUL JOINTS





11 DANGER
SIGNALS

CHIROPRACTIC CENTER, P.C.

DEPRESSION

HEADACHES

.1•11MIMII

STIFFNESS OF
NECK
PAIN BETWEEN
SHOULDERS

I DDL EBEL T RC

) R CHA RD L K R.

m

FARMIN GTON

I

NERVE TENSION

RESTLESS
NIGHTS

gIUMBNESS IN
ARMS AND HANDS

11 ■ 1,

477-5255

\

• CONSULTATION
• CHIROPRACTIC
SPINAL EXAM
• MINIMUM OF 10
SPINAL TESTS FOR
SPINAL EVALUATION

AT

NO CHARGE

IF X-RAYS ARE NECESSARY. MOST
INSURANCE PLANS COVER THE COST

G000 ONLY WHEN PRESENTED
TO THE RECEPTIONIST

PAIN IN CHEST

N\

STIFFNESS OR
/ '\ PAIN IN LOWER
BACK

I

TIRED HIPS
AND LEGS

PAINFUL
JOINTS

MOST INSURANCES
PLANS ACCEPTED

CHIROPRACTIC
CENTER
P.C.

30405 W. 12 Mile-Suite B
Farmington Hills
Lower Level

30405 W. 12 Mile • Farmington Hills • Suite B,' Lower Level

HAPPY
NEW YEAR!
HAPPY
NEW YEAR!

Guaranty Federal
Savings Bank

.111111111•111

We outnice the other banks.

TAYLOR, LINCOLN PARK, DEARBORN, RIVERVIEW, WYANDOTTE, ALLEN PARK, TRENTON, SOUTHGATE, FARMINGTON HILLS

374-3300

18

Friday. October 3, 1986

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Silver would welcome some
sort of Jewish institutional
affiliation. If there was a
Jewish Community Center
(in the area) I'd be connected
to it."
The scarcity of Jewish in-
stitutions east of Woodward
poses a challenge to Jews
who wish to "shop
elsewhere."
Mark and Diane Voight
have lived in Troy for 18
years. Neither is a native De-
troiter. They belong to Cong.
Beth Shalom in Oak Park.
Originally employed on the
east side, the Voights now
own a west side business.
What keeps them in Troy?
"We ended up with such a
nice group of neighbors that
we decided not to move until
the kids are out of school,"
Mark explains.
Their old neighborhood at
Dequindre and Long Lake
Road was 35 percent Jewish,
Mark says. "We had a carpool
to the (kosher) butcher shop."
Their new subdivision at
Coolidge and Big Beaver
Road is less than five percent
Jewish, he believes.
The Voights describe them-
selves as "very active" with
Cong. Beth Shalom. Being
active Conservative Jews is
"slightly less convenient" liv-
ing in Troy, but is offset by
the "liberal atmosphere"
which exists in the suburb.
To insure their three chil-
dren a solid Jewish identity,
the Voights "undertook a lot
of extra drives," encouraging
the children to participate in
Jewish organizations.

I

he east side is not for
everyone, says Susan
Abrams (not her real
name). It is for singles
and young couples.
Susan and her husband
began their marriage in Troy,
but moved to Southfield when
their first child became
school age.
"Once you want to get set-
tled, you want to live in a
Jewish area," Abrams ex-
plains. "I wanted certain
things around me: a Jewish
bakery, a deli. Not that I use
them all the time. But I want
them there."
Abrams says that during
their Troy years, it was dif-
ficult to get their friends to
visit what was for them, "a
foreign land."
The alienation she felt
while living in a non-Jewish
sea still lingers. "I don't feel
there's a lot of Jewish people
there. (East side Jews) like to
believe there are a lot there.
I don't think there are. If
there's one more Jew on the
block, they think that's a big
deal."
It is all a matter of
perspective. To some, east of
Woodward is a new frontier,
an area with a "promising fu-
ture" for Jews, as Iry Wen-
grow enthusiastically puts it.
To others, it is still the "other
side." lacking a Jewish at-

JOHN KOVAKS:
"If you state your beliefs,
people will respect you."

mosphere and a Jewish com-
munal network, and where
Jews are hopelessly in the
minority.
Time will tell if the east
side is the new Eden or just a
disappointing end of the line
for assimilating Jews, echo-
ing, but not reflecting, the
promise made to the Pat-
riarch Abraham:
I will make your offspring
like the dust of the earth .. .
like the stars in the heavens.
Only now will they be as
dispersed as the stars and as
indistinguishable from the
surrounding population as
dust or sand? ❑

Arab Doctors
Get Training

Tel Aviv — Thirty West
Bank physicians comprised
the first graduating class in a
unique program in continu-
ing medical education, jointly
sponsored by Tel Aviv Uni-
versity's Sackler Faculty of
Medicine and the Beit Jala
and Ramallah Hospitals. The
doctors, from Beit Jala,
Bethlehem, Ramallah,
Jericho and Hebron, received
six months of post-graduate
training in internal medicine
from Sackler's medical fa-
culty, and were awarded dip-
lomas in a ceremony held at
the university.
The program is intended to
familiarize West Bank doc-
tors with the latest develop-
ments in internal medicine,
while promoting cooperation
between Arabs and Jews in
the field of public health.
Twenty-one weekly meetings
were held within the
framework of the program,
alternately at Sackler-
affiliated hospitals and at
government hospitals in Beit
Jala and Ramallah.

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