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September 26, 1986 - Image 54

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-09-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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54

Friday, September 26, 1986 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Dr. Disco

Continued from Page 51

r QUALITY KOSHER CATERING

Tuesday Thru Saturday

ENTERTAINMENT

limousine service that caters
to the star in all of us.
How does he do it all? "I'm
the chief of the department,
and I make out the
schedules," he said. "I try to
schedule myself off (when
necessary). There are rare
times when I've had to carry
a beeper with me."
It also takes a lot of organ-
ization, he said. As a pediat-
rician, Dr. Dembs works 5 1/2
days a week, 40-45 hours. As
Doctor Disco, he usually
works only on weekends;
with an occasional afternoon
dance at Norup Middle
School, in Berkley, and Or-
chard Lake Middle School, in
West Bloomfield.
Why a successful doctor
would become involved in
such seemingly diverse
careers is another often asked
question.
"I don't need the money,"
said Dr. Dembs. "My practice
is super busy." But what
began as a hobby has just
continued as a new career, he
said.
Music and the social scene
have been enjoyed by Dembs
since he began dancing les-
sons as a child. At 13 years
old, Dembs won the Teenage
National Title in the U.S.
Ballroom Dancing Cham-
pionship. At 15, he began to
work as a dance instructor at
various Detroit dance studios;
and at the same time, he
began to emcee for parties.
About ten years ago, when
disco became popular, Dr.
Disco was born.
Dr. Dembs has been a
pediatrician for the past ten
years, and has been in pri-
vate practice, with six other
doctors, for the last seven
years, at Woodland Medical
-Center, in Novi.
Because he enjoyed being a
social director, Dr. Dembs
continued to direct parties
throughout medical school,
even though his parents
helped pay for his schooling.
As Doctor Disco, Dr. Dembs
uses the fine controls of a
doctor and applies them to
the business of having a good
time.
Dr. Dembs adjusts the
mood and tempo of his music
to what he senses are the
needs of the guests. He can
be friendly and wild, but al-
ways maintains control. And
yet, when he is called aside
to talk to the host or hostess,
he becomes professional and
attentive.
Being a social director has
helped Dr. Dembs in his
pediatric practice. "It gives
me an insight into kids' peer
groups, and I get to learn
what's going on in their so-
cial climate, on a different
level than I get in the office,"
he said. "Kids are less
frightened to communicate
(at parties), and they talk
about drugs, and other
things. I can see what's going
on first hand."
Being a pediatrician has
also helped Dr. Dembs in his

,

alter ego as Doctor Disco.
There are 75 partners in
Woodland Medical Center,
where Dr. Dembs has his
practice, and he's done sev-
eral parties for them. He's
also directed a few parties for
his patients.
Dr. Dembs had tried to
keep his dual-career a secret,
because he was concerned
that people might wonder
why a doctor was doing disco
parties, but he needn't have
worried.
"I tried to keep it quiet the
first years that I did it, be-
cause I didn't want one to re-
late to the other," he said,
"but it kind of got out. It
hasn't been a deficit."
Dr. Dembs enjoys sporting
events and concerts, and has
season tickets to many. This
led to his third career as the
"doctor-in-the-house" for
many area events.
"Because I was going to so
many concerts," he said, "I
figured that I might as well
have a limousine to go in.
After a while, my friend
Sheldon Yellen and I began
to rent it out — to help it pay
for itself — and we became so
busy that it turned into a
business."
Continental Limousine has
been in business for a little
less than a year. Among the
stars to use the royal blue
stretch Lincoln are Pat Be-
natar and Rodney Danger-
field. But everyone is a star
with this service. This sum-
mer, a promotional special
was run where "we gave
away two free tickets to a
Pine Knob performance with
the rental of the limousine,"
said Dr. Dembs.
Despite his busy schedule,
Dr. Dembs still manages to
have time for himself. "I'm
not a homebody who likes to
sit home and watch T.V.," he
said. "I'm basically out most
nights during the week.
What parties have done is
just changed my own per-
sonal night from Saturday to
Friday."
Dembs seems to have found
his own personal "prescrip-
tion" for happiness and life.
"I enjoy all of it!" he
said. ❑

Games Played
On Yom Kippur

Two baseball playoff games
have been scheduled on Yom
Kippur, Oct. 12-13. The
games will probably be
played in New York and re-
scheduling them is impossi-
ble, according to the major
league commissioner's office.
A statement issued by the
American and National
Leagues, as well as the com-
missioner expressed "regret"
for "any inconvenience"
caused to Jews. "While every
consideration was given to
avoiding such a conflict, in
the end, it could not be done."

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