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September 12, 1986 - Image 18

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Continued from Page 16

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as normal people and' very
approachable," Karen says.
After Ed finished medical
school, he and Karen, along
with their first baby, studied
at Ohr Somayach in Monsey.
A medical resident at Sinai
Hospital, Ed has found his
fellow residents very tolerant
of his Shomer Shabbat
schedule. "They know I'll
take more call during the
week to make up for my
Shabbat absence."
Karen,
a
medical
technologist, has also found
her employers very under-
standing. "They let me work
Sunday instead of Saturday."
The parents of two small
children, the Hurvitzes work
hard to keep a strong Jewish
household and balance their
careers.

C

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18

Friday, September 12, 1986 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

habad Lubavitch is
the Zeyde of Jewish
outreach. For 36
years, Rabbi Menachem
Schneerson, the Brooklyn-
based spiritual leader of
Chabad Lubavitch, has sent
his emissaries to every corner
of the world. Living among
assimilated Jews, the rabbis
and their families act as
lights, illuminating Yid-
dishkeit and persuading fel-
low Jews to take on one
mitzvah (good deeds or com-
mandments) at a time.
Each year, thousands of
Jews are touched by Chabad's
Mitzvot Campaigns. Inside
the Mitzvah Mobile, men are
taught to put on tefillin; a
young woman passes out
Shabbat candles on U of M's
Diag: young children go door
to door at Sukkot, giving
Jewish families the chance to
shake the lulav and etrog.
"Chabad believes in the di-
vine nature of every Jew,"
explains Rabbi Mannis
Friedman, dean of Bais
Chana Institute, the St. Paul,
Minnesota, Lubavitch
women's school. "We must
help every Jew learn to be
fulfilled as a Jew."
In Michigan, there are
Chabad centers in Oak Park,
Farmington Hills, West
Bloomfield, Ann Arbor, Flint
and Grand Rapids. In each
center, there is a rabbi com-
mitted to the needs, of the
Jewish community, working
hard to bring as many
mitzvot as possible to as
many Jews as possible.
Rabbi Elimelech Silberberg
is one of Chabad's Detroit
team. Bright, articulate and
soft-spoken, he is the rabbi of
Cong. Bais Chabad of West
Bloomfield, a congregation he
has assembled of Jews who
enjoy a traditional service,
but are of varying observance
levels.
Action-oriented, Silberberg
believes in the importance of
a single mitzvah. "Every
mitzvah is a work to itself,"
he explains.
To this end, he reaches out
of the entire community,
teaching classical texts and
mystical philosophy for the

Lubavitch Adult School, par-
ticipating in special programs
such as the Jewish Commu-
nity Center-Chabad Matzah
Factory. last Passover, work-
ing as chaplain for the Clin-
ton Valley Center and teach-
ing an after school Hebrew
program for children of all
Jewish backgrounds.
He is particularly proud of
the success stories — Jews
who came to the Lubavitch
rabbis for guidance and in-
struction, felt at home with
Chassidus (the philosophy of
Chabad Chasidic masters)
and took on the Lubavitch
way of life.
Baruch and Esther Wolf, a
young, newly-married couple,
embraced Chabad on differ-
ent continents, he in Ann
Arbor, she in Paris.
Growing up in a Conserva-
tive home, Baruch lost inter-
est in Judaism after his bar
mitzvah and "for the next ten
years I barely made it to
High Holiday services," he
admits.
In the middle of his sopho-
more year at U of M, he de-
cided to explore Judaism,
began to read on his own and
eventually took a class at
Ann Arbor's Hillel House.
From there, he was refered to
Rabbi Goldstein at Chabad
House.
That summer, he attended
an Ohr Somayach summer
camp in Connecticut and re-
turned to school Shomer
Shabbat and kosher, wearing
a yarmulkah and tallis ka-
tan. Several months later, he
felt comfortable enough to
untuck the tzitzit and let
them hang at his side. -
He resumed his dialogue
with Rabbi Goldstein, but
was a bit wary. "I had been
warned against Lubavitch."
However, for Baruch, the
teachings of Chassidus made
Judaism come alive.
Growing up in a Sephardic
family in Paris, Esther was
greatly influenced by her sis-
ter who had married a
Lubavitcher and was raising
her family in the Lubavitch
tradition.
"I used to go to my sister's
for Shabbos. Everything was
so beautiful, so peaceful.
There was' singing . . . the
whole family was always to-
gether."
Baruch and Esther met in
Brooklyn, where each had
gone to be closer to the heart
of the movement. Within four
months, they were engaged.
Today they are active in the
Oak Park Lubavitch commu-
nity and also at the Ann
Arbor Chabad House.
Often the paths to
Lubavitch vary. Ten years
ago, Rabbi Silberberg was
approached by a Bloomfield
area woman in her mid-30s
who wanted to augment her
study of astrology with a pri-
vate course on Kabbalah.
At first she was astonished
by the amount of knowledge.
"I tried to connect my astrol-

Continued on Page 20

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