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September 05, 1986 - Image 74

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-09-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CONGREGATION SHAARIT HAPLAYTAH

- :• 71 t'1.4

:-.^•tnn

METROPOLITAN DETROIT, MICHIGAN

111 r

1 14:

1 17 "

6 6:

CONGREGATION SHAARIT HAPLAYTAH IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE

HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES

CANTOR SEYMOUR GREENSTEIN
DR. ZVI GITELMAN

Continued from preceding page

Rosh Hashonah: October 3, 4, 5, 1986
Yom Kippur: October 12, 13, 1986

5747

1986

To be held at the

Glenn Schoenhals School

16500 Lincoln Drive, Southfield
Donation $25 per person

The High Holidays will soon be here. Please make your reservations
today by calling any of the following:

Jack Waksberg

Sol Kleinman

Chairman

Ticket Co-Chairman

557-4157

356-3383

Abe Weberman

Pres., Ticket Chairman

626-5224

Harry Praw

Sonia Popowski

557-3994

Simon Schwarzberg Leon Halpern
661-1782
541-7450
557-4157

Joseph Slaim

Mrs. Ben Fisk

Co-Chairman

968-1686

357-0069

545-1244

All proceeds from High Holiday will go to American Red Mogen Adom

Advertising in The Jewish News Gets Results
Place Your Ad Today. Call 354-6060

Congregation
Beth Achim
High Holiday Services

in the MAIN SANCTUARY will be Conducted by

RABBI MILTON ARM and
CANTOR MAX SHIMANSKY

MEMBERSHIPS AVAILABLE

AUXILIARY HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES

Auxiliary Social Hall

RABBI BENJAMIN H. GORRELICK will officiate
and
DAVID ARM WILL CHANT MUSAF SERVICES

TICKETS 80.00

LaMED AUDITORIUM

At United Hebrew School, Rohlik Building

RABBI HERBERT ESKIN and
CANTOR BARRY ULRYCH

will officiate

TICKETS 60.00

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT:

21100 WEST 12 MILE RD., SOUTHFIELD, MI

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL 352-8670

74

Friday. September 5, 1986

SIZE EEEEE SHOES

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

over the skyscrapers to Central Park and
get her bearings.
"We're on the right street, Mama," said
Marian, hitching the strap of her purse
higher on her shoulder. "Fishman's isn't
here anymore. They must have gone out of
business."
"Out of business?" Sadie repeated.
"Why?"
"I don't know," Marian said impatient-
ly. "How should I know? Maybe something
happened to Mr. Fishman. Maybe he re-
tired. Maybe he got sick of selling shoes.
I don't know. But he's not here anymore,
that's for sure."
Sadie hugged her purse to her chest and
stood with her feet planted far apart. For
an instant she felt as if she were in a dream
that she often had: she was lost in an im-
penetrable fog and couldn't find her way
home. Somewhere on the other side of the
fog her mother was calling to her, but her
voice always seemed to be coming from
another direction, and she was lost, lost.
... A shiver ran up her back. She withdrew
her hand from Marian's arm and pointed
to the lingerie store. "Go in there and ask
them what happened to Mr. Fishman."
Marian drew back. "Are you crazy,
Mama? I'm not going in there."
Sadie looked at her daughter, then back
at the store windows. A few of the manne-
quins were life-size, their heads thrown
back and their red mouths open in ecstasy,
but most were just torsos, extending from
the neck to above the knees, curiously be-
headed and befooted. Their pointy breasts
pushed forward and their buttocks thrust
backward, backs arched provocatively.
Sadie tried to remember whether, during
all those years with Abe, she had ever got-
ten into that position.. She doubted it; they
had had pleasure without such contortions.
Some people walked by; she felt their
gaze on her and she looked up. Marian
tugged her arm. "Come on, Mama, let's get
out of here. People will think we're going
to buy some of that stuff." Sadie let
Marian lead her away. She waddled heavi-
ly to the corner. Marian hailed a cab. As
the taxi drove down 54th Street, tears
welled up in Sadie's eyes. Marian reached
over and patted her knee. "Don't worry,
Mama. We'll find another shoe store, you'll
see." Sadie said nothing. After a moment
Marian added, "Come on, Mama, tell the
truth. Weren't you getting a little sick of
those same shoes anyway? Pursing her
lips, Sadie looked out the taxi window.
• She was quiet over lunch even though
Marian took her to Schrafft's and ordered
her a mushroom omlette, her favorite. Not
even going to Bloomingdale's and picking
out three new housedresses cheered her up.
On their way out of the store, they passed
a table full of silk scarves and Marian
paused to finger them. Suddenly she said,
"Hey, Mama, this one would go with your
blue dress, don't you think?" Before Sadie
could answer Marian opened her purse and

said cheerfully, "It's on me, Mama," and
whisked her away to the cash register. She
remembered to 'say, "Thank you, Marian,"
when she handed her the small brown bag.
On the way home Sadie swayed back and
forth with the motion of the train. She had
always liked trains, liked their heavy iron
solidity and their clicks and whistles and
the funny optical illusions they played on
you. Ever since she was a child standing
on her grimy fire escape, wondering what
exotic places the tidy tracks and puffs of
smoke led to, she had loved them. She re-
membered the first time she rode on one,
clutching her father's hand so tightly that
he kept laughing and saying, "Let go,
Saidala, don't squeeze so hard." When,
finally, the train lurched into motion, her
heart beat so fast she thought her chest
must surely explode. God, that was long

`Everything dependable,
all the things that made
it possible to live this
crazy life, were disap-
pearing one by one.

ago, long ago, she thought, swaying.
The rhythm of the train soothed her. She
yawned, stretched her short legs and saw
her shoes. The sense of foreboding crept
over her again. She felt adrift, abandoned.
What was happening to the world? Every-
thing dependable, all the things that made
it possible to live this crazy life, were disap-
pearing one by one. First Abe was taken
from her — she wouldn't presume to ques-
tion God's will, of course, but it was hard,
so hard. Then the friendly butcher retired
and was replaced by an insolent young
man who didn't know her or care how she
liked her meat cut.
And now this. The same shoes for 35
years — was she now supposed to change
shoe stores, change shoes; remold her feet,
just like that? How dare Mr. Fishman close
the store? Had he no regard for his loyal
customers? He had no right, no right, no
right ... Her head bouncing softly against
the train window, she slept.
After Marian left the apartment, Sadie
lowered herself onto the floor like a great
awkward elephant, and took stock of her
shoes. Besides the pair she was wearing,
she had one pair of bone and another black.
She cursed herself for having let Marian
give the previous two pairs away to chari-
ty; she could have squeezed a little more
life out of them, had she known. Well, three
pairs wasn't so bad. She could make them
last a good while yet. And then ... she

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