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September 05, 1986 - Image 61

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-09-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SIUNPIS Cat

OMELETTES

WAFFLES

10% SENIOR CITIZENS DISCOUNT

O



Solomon, who has creative
control over her photo col-
umns that appear in the
News, often jets off to Los
Angeles or the Big Apple
where it's not unusual to find
her at a gala ball or at posh
Hollywood parties garbed in
a glittering evening gown
with 35-pounds of camera
equipment stashed beside
her. She recently attended a
Friars Club benefit dinner in
New York where Frank
Sinatra was the master of
ceremonies and tickets sold
upwards to $10,000 a person.
Earlier this year, Solomon
flew to Los Angeles to attend
a special dinner in honor of
Barbra Streisand who was
awarded the Scopus Award
by Hebrew University. Some
of the guests at that posh
event included Neil Diamond,
Gregory Peck and George
Burns.
"Streisand is extremely shy
in public, so she hardly
looked or spoke to anyone
during that entire evening,"
said Solomon.
Linda's husband, Barry, ac-
companies his wife to some
social events. "But he can't
always take time away from
his busy schedule to go with
me," said Solomon.
When in Los Angeles, Sol-
omon stays with her parents,
Mona and Dan Rappaport,
who live there part of the
year and the rest of the time
in Birmingham.
When she goes to New
York, she stays with younger
sister Jill Rappaport, who's
the host of New York's P.M.
Magazine program. "So, I
have the best of two worlds
and I never have to stay in a
hotel," said Solomon.
Solomon said that her
mother and dad have played

a "wonderfully supportive"
role in helping to shape her
career as well as her sister's.
Highly regarded at the
News, this past summer Sol-
omon was the only woman
invited to speak at the
Michigan Legislative Confer-
ence chaired by Gov. James
J. Blanchard with special
keynote speaker, Allen
Neuharth, chairman of Gan-
nett Newspapers, Inc.
She recently signed on with
Channel 4 to do a series of
segments, "Celebrity Can-
dids," which will begin this
week and will be aired reg-
ularly beginning Oct. 1.
Solomon has been making
images of life since she was
eight years old when her par-
ents surprised her with a
camera. "I was always the
one on the block with the
camera," said Solomon. "La-
ter, I was there to document
every birthday party, every
college activity, every impor-
tant moment of my life and I

loved it." She also studied at
various photography schools.
After completing her edu-
cation at Arizona and Michi-
gan universities, Solomon
began to seek celebrities as
subjects. Later she did some
free-lance work for a small
community newspaper and
eventually established herself
as a person who photo-
graphed famous and in-
famous people.
One of Solomon's favorite
subjects came to her as a
birthday gift from her hus-
band. "It's my little dog,
Rambo, a ten-month-old Wes-
tie who's the smartest dog
alive."
Constantly on the go and
with invitations to more so-
cial affairs than they can
possibly attend, Barry and
Linda value their leisure
time together.
"For me, a dream vacation
would be just to stay home
with Barry and Rambo." ❑

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Young Couples
Plan A Picnic

The Young Jewish Couples
Club, based at the Maple/
Drake Jewish Community
Center, will have a picnic on
Sept. 14 at noon at the Camp
Ruth II Facility located be-
hind the main building.
Couples should bring their
own main dish and some-
thing to pass. The hamburger
and hot dog fixings,
lemonade, ice tea, plates,
cups and silverware and
watermelon will be provided.
There will be sports
equipment available for
softball, soccer, basketball,'
twister and a number of pic-
nic games including paper
bag dramatics. Children are
invited and there will be ac-
tivities for them too.
For reservations or infor-
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family.

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composers from the Medieval
and late Renaissance periods,
will open the musical season
at Temple Israel on Sept. 14
at 8 p.m.
The program, to be pre-
sented by the Ensemble for
Early Jewish Music, will
highlight Temple Israel's an-
nual Mildred S. Steinberg-
Andrew Chalat Memorial
Concert.
EEJM consists of five
musicians from the New
York area, each playing a
number of instruments that
are authentically reproduced
from the Medieval and Re-
naissance periods.
Andrew Galambos, the
founder and director of

EEJM, is a specialist in
woodwinds. Peter Bannon
plays the lute and sackbut,
and Barbara Benary, the only
female in the group, plays
the strings.
Steven Silverstein is the
brass player, and Melvyn
Novick, cantor of Progressive
Shaare Zedek Synagogue in
Brooklyn, N.Y., is the voc-
alist.
Steinberg-Chalat
The
Memorial Fund was created
by Myron Steinberg and Dr.
and Mrs. Ned Chalat in
memory of their wife and
grandson and mother and
son.
The concert is open to the
community, free of charge.
Tickets must be obtained
from Temple Israel, 661-5700.

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