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September 05, 1986 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-09-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

GULIAN'S 1

COUPON

C Dry Cleaning

Sale

C

0

SINCE 1915

Formerly of Somerset Mall

DRY CLEANING

ORCHARD MALL
WEST BLOOMFIELD

Thru 9-18-86

851-5516

C ()UPON

UMMIIIIIIIM
111111 111• 11M11•11 11•1 1111B•1111 11111E

I

1
I

HUGGIES DIAPERS I

Featuring: DISNEY CHARACTERS

$ 8.85

1

Family Run Pharmacy

WALIJRAKE

PHARMACY
I

per case

1

(with a $5.00 purchase-
excluding diapers)
Exp. 9-14-86

WALDRAKE PHARMACY
s am m...•••••........a.=

1
1

KEN JACOBS, R.Ph.

• FREE DELIVERY
• SENIOR CITIZEN DISCOUNT

5548 Drake Rd.
West Bloomfield

1.00 OFF!
I FILM PROCESSING

(corner of Walnut Lake &
1 mile north of J.C.C.)

Prints Only
We feature double prints for
one low price!
Exp. 9-14-86

661-0774

Mon. Sat. 9 a.m.-8 p.m.

-

1 WALDRAKE PHARMACY
01111111•1111111•11111111•11 1111 =111• 11•111• 111•V

Sunday 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

111111111 118 11111111111111•111• 11•1 111•11•111M1=111

$200
_•

1

1

OFF

on your next
prescription or
refill from any
pharmacy

1
1
WALDRAKE PHARMACY
1 11111111111111111111•11
11 NOMMINIMMIN IIIMIN•

I

1
1

Five 22c STAMPS

for $1.00

(limit 20 stamps)

Exp. 9-14-86

1

WALDRAKE PHARMACY

wed Grossman el liery

requests your presence as our
special guest for a major
showing of recent works by
nationally known

pawl maxwell

PAINTINGS • DRAWINGS • GRAPHICS

* FRIDAY, SEPT. 5, 1986 6-9 pm
* SATURDAY, SEPT. 6, 1986 1-5 pm 7.9 pm
* SUNDAY, SEPT. 7, 1986 1-5 pm

EXHIBITION THRU SEPT. 20th

* ARTIST IN ATTENDANCE

wed Grossman Gilliery

29528 Northwestern Highway in Sunset Strip Southfield, Ml 48034 (313) 350-1686

16 Friday, September 5, 1986

Continued from preceding page

EROTICA NETSUKE
JADE TREES
LAPIS LAZUU
JADE, MALACITE
AND OTHER STONE CARVINGS
ALSO
A VERY FINE SELECTION OF JEWELRY

SUTTON PLACE

23119 Lahs•r at 9 Mile

Stormy Seas

MICHIGAN'S LARGEST SELECTION OF

*Bring in ANY 2 like garments;
pay the regular price on the 1st
item, get the 2nd one for only 1°.

Excluding other
coupon specials.
Household items
& silks

CLOSE-UP

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

1
1
1
1
I

cursion boat on the Yangtze
River in China. Weinsaft re-
members that the ship was
built by the same company
that built Detroit's Bob-Lo
boats.
The Warfield left Baltimore
in early January 1947 with
two captains: Schlagel, who
was licensed to pilot the ship
and who believed they were
going to China, and Captain
Ike (Y. Isaac Aronowicz), the
Haganah captain who was
actually in charge. Unfortu-
nately, it ran into one of the
worst storms of the season
after leaving sheltered
Chesapeake Bay.
"I remember the news said
six ships sank off Hatteras in
that storm right in our area,"
said Marks. "There was a big
picture of The ship on the
front page of the newspaper.
It said, 'Ship Going to China
With 95 Percent Jewish
Crew.' Everybody on the East
Coast knew where we were
going."
The storm's fury smashed
oil drums through the War-
field's deck, most of the crew
were violently sick and the
ship was taking on huge
quantities of water. Finally,
an SOS was sent out as they
tried to turn back to Norfolk.
A Russfan ship answered
the distress signal. As it
steamed within sight they
asked what type of ship the
Warfield was. Displaying the
humor that was to char-
acterize their adventure they
replied, "We are the Staten
Island Ferry. We were swept
out to sea."
After being repaired and
re-outfitted, they headed out
to sea again, in early Feb-
ruary.
Humor was essential to the
crew. In typical American
fashion they were able to joke
about the problems of the
ship, which had an American
crew to handle the ship and a
Haganah crew to handle the
people. "Those (Haganah)
guys had no sense of humor,"
Marks recalls. "They were
serious about what they were
doing and we were serious
too — but you can't go
through life always so damn
serious."
There was plenty of levity
as the ship crossed the Atlan-
tic. The crew celebrated
Passover with a Seder pre-
pared by the Greek cook. The
Four Questions were asked
by the youngest crew
member, a 17-year-old from
Baltimore. Frequent song
sessions and joking took
place. A favorite song, Fight,
Fight, Fight, for Palestine,
made fun of what they were
doing.
When the ship needed to be
refueled in the Azores, in-
genuity prevailed. American
fishermen bought fuel and oil
from the British and they
siphoned it into the Warfield.
The ship spent two months
in Puerto Venerva La Spen-
zia in Italy being properly
outfitted. Shelving was

placed across each room for
beds. Eighteen inches per
person was allowed. This
meant that people could not
move freely about the ship.
Life jackets, life boats and
supplies were also purchased,
and the ship sailed to France.
In addition to purchasing
supplies, Weinsaft helped ar-
range the transfer of refugees
from Camp De Grande
Arenas — a former French
Legionaires camp — to Sette.
Again, ingenuity and daring
were needed. The day before
the French Grand Prix, the
refugees were brought by
truck convoy to Sette on the
race route while the local
gendarmes looked the other
way.
It took ten hours to • trans-
fer the refugees to the ship,
and the now-alert British
were pressuring the French
government to keep the ship
in port. Police were stationed
on the dock, but the crew
threw a party and drugged
the guards' drinks. While the
police slept, the crew cut the
lines and the ship quietly
slipped out of port.
On the open sea, British
destroyers were waiting. The
Warfield, still flying the
Honduran flag, informed the
British that it would be con-
sidered an act of piracy if
they tried to board in inter-
national waters. The British
used loudspeakers to threaten
and intimidate the crew and
passengers. In response,
hand-painted taunts were
hung on the side of the ship.
As the President Warfield
steamed toward Palestine,
the Honduran flag was re-
placed with the Star of
David. The ship was to be re-
named at sea, but paint was
scarce. After futile attempts
to make their own paint the
crew decided to paint out
Warfield and paint in Tru-
man. Accidentally,
"President" was also painted
out. The scarcity of paint
forced a second name change
to the much shorter
"Exodus."
Living conditions on the
ship were difficult at best.
"Not everybody could move
around at the same time,"
said Marks. "For meals, usu-
ally one person was desig-
nated to go and pick it up —
a soup or stew or something
like that — and bring it back
to where the refugees were.
We arranged for them to get
air, although they all wanted
to go up at once."
"Nighttime was amazing,"
Weinsaft recalled. "The ship
was quiet. There was no
noise, except you could hear
the engine."
The overpowering memory
from the trip was the odor of
human bodies packed into
tight quarters. -•
But there was also joy.
They left Sette on Friday,
July 11, 1947. At sundown,,
white table cloths appeared \
on deck. People began to ob-
serve the sabbath. Spirits

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