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August 15, 1986 - Image 60

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-08-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

U



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60

Friday, August 15, 1986

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Jerusalem (JTA) — Israel
will resume diplomatic ties
with Poland and Hungary
before such ties are formed
with the Soviet Union, polit-
ical sources here said last
week. The sources claimed
that ties with Poland — at the
lowest diplomatic level of "in-
terest sections" in Warsaw
and Tel Aviv — are expected
to be established this month
followed by similar relations
with Hungary.
Poland's resumption of
diplomatic contacts with
Israel was initiated by War-
saw, although this move ap-
parently received the green
light from Moscow, according
to Israeli experts on Poland.
That green light was given
recently and, the experts
noted, explains the delay in
the implementation of the
agreement in principle which
was reached several months
ago in talks between Israeli
and Polish diplomats in
Bonn.
As for relations between
Hungary and Israel, the two
countries have had relative
developed contacts for some
time. Hungary, for example,
has for the past three sum-
mers been a popular destina-
tion for Israeli tourists.
The pending resumption of
relations with Poland and
Hungary is seen here as part
of an overall effort by the
Israeli Foreign Ministry to
break the diplomatic ice in
Soviet bloc nations, without
directly tying it to the
scheduled Israeli-Soviet con-
sular talks in Helsinki.
The assumption here is
that the USSR announced
the talks, albeit in the context
of discussing Soviet assets in
Israel, as a sign that the Rus-
sians believe there may be
some diplomatic movement
in the Mideast soon. Moscow,
according to this theory, does
not want to be left out of the
action.
Another diplomatic ice-
breaker between Soviet bloc
countries and Israel was the
visit here by an emissary of
Rumania President Nicolae
Ceausescu, who met with
Prime Minister Shimon Peres
and Deputy Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir and reported-
ly urged them to agree to an
international peace con-
ference to be attended by all
the parties concerned, in-
cluding the Soviet Union and
the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
The mass circulation Yediot
Achronot reported that El Al
was making preparations for
direct Tel Aviv-Warsaw
flights. Poland, like Hungary,
is open to Israeli tourists.
According to reports re-
cently, Mordechai Palitzur
will represent Israel in War-
saw. TWenty-five years ago, he
served as Second Secretary of

Israel's Embassy in Warsaw.
Until recently, he served as
Israel's Ambassador to the
Dominican Republic. The tim-
ing of Palitzur's departure to
Warsaw, along with a number
of staff members, depends on
technical issues, particularly
finding suitable housing.
Yoav Biran, Deputy Direc-
tor General of the Foreign
Ministry, visited Poland to
deal with those technical
issues. He initiated work on
the building that housed the
Israel Embassy before Poland
broke diplomatic relations in
1967. Israel has continued
paying rent for the past 19
years.
A Polish delegation is also
in Israel, for the same pur-
pose, to resituate its -office in
the same building which
served as its Embassy before
the break in diplomatic rela-
tions — the building of the
Polish bank on Allenby Street
in 1bl Aviv.
In spite of the optimism in
Jerusalem over these devel-
opments, sources stressed
that at this stage the ranks of
representation by both Israel
and Poland will remain at the
low level "interest sections."

Refusenik
Arrives
In Israel

New York (JTA) — Alek-
sandr Kushnir, 38, a refusenik
since 1977, was reunited last
week with his family in Israel,
after 13 years separation, ac-
cording to the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry. His
mother, Rachel, and his
brother, Efim, have been in
Israel since 1973. where his
grandparents live. His father,
Semyon, was killed in a tragic
work accident in 1970, at the
age of 42, in Odessa.
Aleksandr, a construction
engineer, studied nights and
worked as a porter to support
himself while living alone in
Odessa. Having served in the
Soviet Navy, he waited the
customary five years from his
demobilization to apply.
However, since his applica-
tion, he lived under constant
threat of arrest. He could not
find work in his profession
and was forced to work as a
building technician in a small
town near Odessa.
In a related development,
Leningrad refusenik, Isaac
Kogan, 40, and his family was
promised an exit visa. Kogan
who applied for visa in 1974,
is an observant Jew. He gave
classed in Tbrah and Talmud,
and was recognized by Soviet
Jews as one of the most
knowledgeable Jews in the
Soviet Union.

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