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August 08, 1986 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-08-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Bruce m. weiss

AUDETTE CADILLAC, INC.
BUY or LEASE from
FRED STONE

Member
Cadillac Crest Club
Highest Achievement

Southeast corner Northwestern

Behind Gabe's Fruits
in The Mayfair Shops

AUDETTE CADILLAC 7100 Orchard Lake Rd.

FOCUS

Jewelers
26325 Twelve Mile Rd.

Mon.-Sat. 10-5:30
Thurs. 10-8:30

851-7200

353-1424

Rightist Liberty Lobby
Is Judged Anti-Semitic

VICTOR BIENSTOCK

Special to The Jewish News

FOR YOUR NEW FALL FASHION WARDROBE • •

nirirwin Prtinnitiza
I ) Allit I if 17 WINE
FIVAILOIr4/111111111111111111
featuring .
855-4460
Nano Heller
Adrienne Vittadine

open daily
10-5:30
Wed. & Fri. 9

St. Germain

AT HUNTERS SQUARE
ORCHARD LAKE RD.
AT 14 MILE

NEW

fall fashions
arriving daily

Downtown-Uptown

"YEAR END SUPER SALE"

40-80% Off

SAT., AUG. 9, 10-4 P.M. MICHIGAN INN

16400 J.L. HUDSON DR.
SOUTHFIELD

*Suits, Dresses, Sportswear, Accessories & Designer Samples

LYNN PORTNOY

Master & Visa

964-0339

532 BRUSH
DETROIT, MI 48226

77/() o(yylsion.
AUGUST FOR SALE

The Place:

HALTER FURS

The Puipose:

OUTFIT VOL
IN OUR LATEST
FALL FASHIONS

The Price:

THE BEST NEWS OF
ALL, MOST EVERY-
THING ROLLED
BACK TO 1983.

Sale ends August 30. 1986

MAITER FURS F



DESIGNERS OF FINE It RS

21712 It.

I imir ICU i n

30 Friday, August 8, 1986

• so !

T111, 714:0).

18076

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

reedom of speech is a
wondrous thing despite its
many abuses. It permits
the Liberty Lobby, an extreme
rightist outfit which serves as a
link for many of America's
lunatic fringe organizations, to
publish anti-Semitic material
and to abet extremists like the
so-called Populist Party which
stir the fires of hate against the
Jews in the hard-pressed
Mid-West farm belt. But it also
gives the Wall Street Journal
the right to denounce the
Liberty Lobby and condemn its
anti-Semitism.
The Liberty Lobby insists on
its right to traduce the Jews —
as it has done for 25 years —
but it objects to exposure and
would deny the paper's right to
expose its bias. Consequently, it
sued the newspaper, charging
defamation in articles which de-
scribed the outfit as "anti-
Semitic".
In due course, the case came
up in Federal Court in Wash-
ington and was thrown out by
Judge Thomas Jackson. In the
first place, the court ruled, the
lobby failed to furnish evidence
required in libel actions to prove
that the articles were printed
with malice or disregard of the
truth.
As to the truth of the news-
paper's charges, Judge Jackson
concluded that to the extent
that the phrase "anti-Semitic"
can be considered "an objec-
tively verifiable fact, it is dif-
ficult to imagine a case in which
the evidence of it is more com-
pelling."
Liberty Lobby identified itself
recently in Spotlight, its weekly
newspaper, as "the
Washington-based populist in-
stitution which was established
to combat the special interests."
The Anti-Defamation League
has described it as "the best-
financed anti-Semitic organiza-
tion in the United States" and
Spotlight" .as "the most widely
read right-wing extremist news-
paper in the country."
A recent issue of Spotlight at-
tacked California Sen. Alan
Cranston and Jerry Warburg,
his 31-year old aide. It had this
to say: Warburg "is the great
grandson of international
banker Felix Warburg, who
played a key role in bringing
the communists to power in
Russia."
A parenthetical note adver-
tised a supplement, Christian
Holocaust, purporting to tell
"the full story of the Warburg
family's alliance with the Bol-
sheviks."

F



%HI 11111)

The theme of the discussion
was to have been, "Writing in a
Young • State — In a
Traumatized Society." The par-
ticipants were 40 Israeli and
German authors meeting at the
Friedrich Naumann Foundation
near Bonn. But the major issue

inevitably turned out to be the
Holocaust.
"The Holocaust is the only
issue for discussion by Jews and
Germans," asserted Joseph
Lapid, writer and former direc-
tor of Israel's radio and televi-
sion authority. "There can never
be another." He criticized what
he described as an offensive lack
of feeling some Germans showed
toward Jews and expressed the
feeling that, since 1970, there
has been a tendency in German
literature to ascribe guilt to the
Jews.
Lapid cited Heinar Kip-
Brother
phardt's play,
Eichmann, which, he said,
clearly equates Auschwitz and
the Israel military activities at
Beirut. "To compare the histori-
cally unique genocide of the
Jews with Beirut or any other
event," he exclaimed, is to make
(Auschwitz) appear harmless."
The more the Jews are accused
of guilt, he noted, the less re-
sponsibility Germans need to

The ADL calls the
Liberty Lobby the
best financed
anti-Semitic
organization in the
U.S.

feel for Auschwitz.' "But," he
warned, "this guilt can never
end — not after 40 years, not
after 400 years."
Dietmar Kanthak, who wrote
about the conference in the
Bonn General Anzeiger, reported
that Lapid was warmly sup-
ported by Lea Fleischmann who
complained of the difficulty of
communication since the
thought and behavior patterns
of the German people had not
changed. The Germans, she as-
serted, had remained as trustful
of authority as they were 50
years ago.
But member of Knesset Mor-
dechai Virshubsky insisted that
"life goes on despite Auschwitz"
and warned that Auschwitz, as
a symbol of horror was being
reduced by constant repetition
to an empty phrase. Literature
and art, he insisted, must not
dwell exclusively in the past,
Reporter Kanthak noted that
the Germans had been put on
the defensive. But his, he said,
was the historically correct posi-
tion since "German writers, in-
cluding those representing the
younger generation, are victims
of German history. They, too,
live and write in a traumatized
society."
Kanthak concluded his report
on a hopeful note: the dis-
cussions between Germans and
Jews had been difficult and
painful, yet, "in the end there
was a barely perceptible, fragile
rapproachement, an agreement
to talk with each other regard-
less of what had happened. That
may not be much but is was still
a great deal."

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