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July 25, 1986 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-07-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

S. African Jews
Oppose Sanctions

THIS ISSUE 50c

SERVING DETROIT'S JEWISH COMMUNITY

Peres In Morocco:
Reaction Is Mixed

Jerusalem (JTA) — Premier
Shimon Peres was in Morocco for
talks with King Hassan II in what
many observers see as the first major
Middle East peace initiative since
President Anwar Sadat of Egypt went
to Jerusalem nine years ago. Peres'
trip was unannounced but reaction in
Israel was broadly positive.

Peres arrived in Morocco Monday
night on an Israel Air Force executive
jet. He was expected to remain 48
hours as Hassan's guest at the King's
summer residence at Efrana, about

160 miles southeast of the capital,
Rabat.
Political experts and diplomats
here and abroad believed the talks
concentrated on ways and means to
break the deadlocked Middle East
situation. Some diplomats in Rabat
were said to believe Hassan may try
to arrange an official summit meeting
between Peres and King Hussein of
Jordan.
Peres and Hassan held their first
round of talks shortly after the Israeli

Continued on Page 26

Hearings Deplore
Anti-Arab Violence

ALAN HITSKY

News Editor

Congressional hearings last week
on violence directed against Arab
Americans will spur greater efforts by
law enforcement agencies and may
lead to greater ties between Arab and
Jewish groups, according to an aide to
hearings sponsor John Conyers (D-
Detroit).
The aide, Julian Epstein, told
The Jewish News that the hearings
put the Federal Bureau of Investiga-
tion publicly on record for the first
time to give anti-Arab violence in the
United States its "highest priority."
Epstein said the pattern of violence
against Arab Americans has been
occurring for 15 years.

Amazing Marketplace

72

Births

68

Business

. .... ........ ... 56

Engagements

Obituaries

62

47, 86

Danny Raskin

46

Singles

70

Synagogues

40

Women

60

The hearings accepted testimony
from members of Congress, the FBI,
and a panel of four: former Senator
James Abourezk representing the
American-Arab Anti-Discrimination
Committee (AAADC); David Saad,
Arab American Institute; and the
American Jewish Committee's
Hyman Bookbinder and Dr. David M.
Gordis.
Arab spokesmen and Jewish
groups, Epstein said, linked the vio-
lence to "Jewish fringe groups" and
others who reacted to Middle East
events. They cited the bombing death
of the AAADC's West Coast director,
Alex Odeh, in California last October,
and violence against Arab American
stores and individuals in Dearborn,
Mich., New York and Illinois follow-
ing the U.S. air strike against Libya
this spring and the Achille Lauro
hijacking and murder of Leon Min-
ghoffer last fall.
Epstein said all the groups pre-
sent, including the AJCommittee,
recognized the involvement of Jewish
fringe groups — such as the Jewish
Defense League" — in the violence.
Arab and FBI spokesmen cited the
JDL's encouragement and applauding
of violent acts, including the murder
of Odeh, while claiming they have no
responsibility for the acts.
Richard Lobenthal, Michigan
Region director of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith,

Continued on Page 28

JULY 25, 1986 / 18 TAMMUZ 5746

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