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June 20, 1986 - Image 74

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-06-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

For insurance
call

C.L.U.

SY WARSHAWSKY,

6668 Orchard Lake Road

in the West Bloomfield
Shopping Plaza

W. Bloomfield
48033



626-2652

It's Delightful
It's Delovelyl
It's

FRANKIE PAUL

Like a good neighbor. State Farm is there.

Advertising in The Jewish News
Gets Results
Place Your Ad Today.
Call 354-6060

CONGRATULATIONS

TO THE PRINCESS
MICHELLE LYNN KALT

w

on her acceptance to the
Rhode Island School of Design

If MAMA BEE could be with us,
she would be very proud!

Uncle Steve

Solos, Combos or Orchestra

557-7986

LORI DEBRA RUHR

Congratulations
on Graduating
SUMMA CUM LAUDE
Oakland University
School of Business

All Our Love,
David, Mom, Dad & Jeff

There will be an an-
nual meeting of The
Jewish Vocational
Service and Commu-
nity Workshop for the
purpose of electing
officers on June 25,
1986 from 4 p.m. to
6 p.m. at Somerset
Inn, 2601 W. Big Be-
aver Rd., Troy, Mi.
48084.

so--ari Off

thru 6/29/86

kerwupd Auclo8

Professional Interior Designers

Tel-Twelve Mall • 12 Mile & Telegraph, Southfield
Daily 10-9, Sunday 12-5 • 354-9060

Fine furniture and accessories always 20% off

Friday, June 20, 1986

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

40.

4■ 11

The perfect accent.
Choose from a wide variety of
unusual shapes, sizes, styles and
textures in the most vivid colors.
Very fashionable. Very comfortable.
Very reasonable.

74

Citrin, Stollman Re-Elected
To Family Service, RS

AND HIS MUSIC

Office Phnne

See me for car, home.
life and health
insurance.

LOCAL NEWS

Susan Citrin was re-elected
president of Jewish Family Serv-
ice and Bernard H. Stollman was
re-elected president of Resettle-
ment Service at the combined
annual meeting of the two agen-
cies.
At this meeting, Dr. Paul Pear-
sall, Chief of Problems of Daily
Living Clinic, Department of
Psychiatry, Sinai Hospital of De-
troit, Spoke on "Key Crises in
Life: Can We Cope Better?"
Sharon Hart and Jerome Levy
were re-elected vice presidents of
Jewish Family Service and Ed-
ward Gold was re-elected trea-
surer. Julie Gurwin, John Jacobs,
Eric Lutz and Janice Shatzman
were elected to the executive
committee-at-large and Marvin
C. Daitch was elected as chair-
man of the nominating commit-
tee for 1986-1987.
Re-elected to the board for
three-year terms were: Judge
Jessica Cooper, Claudia Gold,
Nancy Jacobson, Mickey Kole,
Maida Portnoy, Edith Resnick
and Ms. Shatzman.
Elected for first three-year
terms as members of the board
were: Doreen Hermelin, Barbara
Grant, Dr. John D. Marx and
Barbara Stollman.
Officers elected for Resettle-
ment Service for 1986-1987 were:
Rabbi Lane • Steinger, vice
president; George Tarnoff, trea-
surer; and Max Sosin, treasurer.
Re-elected to the board for
three-year terms were: Judith
Cantor, Marcy Feldman, Sidney
J. Karbel, Esther Klein, Sandra
Sherman, Dr. Peter Shifrin,
Robert A. Steinberg, Lucille
Weisberg and Rabbi Steinger.
Elected for a first three-year
term were: Sanford Hansell, Jef-
frey H. Howard and Bess Krolik.

In her annual report, Ms. Cit-
rin noted the increased amount of
service provided to the commu-
nity by the agency. The total
number of cases served increased
from 3,635, in 1984 to 3,686 in
1985. The average number of
clients serviced per week with
kosher Meals-on-Wheels in-
creased from 172 in 1984 to 195
in 1985. There was an increase in
the number of hours of volunteer
services from 13,425 in 1984 to
14,307 in 1985. A similar in-
crease occurred in homemaker
service. The number of clients
served increased from 296 in
1984 to 328 in 1985.
Stollman reported on the major
decline of emigration of Jews
from the Soviet Union due, in
part, to the strain in United
States-Soviet relations in recent
years. He noted from a peak of
more than 51,000 refugees set-
tled in the United States in 1980,
only several hundred have been
permitted out of the Soviet Union
in recent years. During 1985, the
agency resettled ten emigrants
from the Soviet Union.
He announced that word had
been received from the State De-
partment indicating that one of
the refugees now permitted to
leave the Soviet Union for a rela-
tive reunion will join her daugh-
ter in Detroit after seven years of
separation.
Stollman noted that the agency

Bernard Stollman

Susan Citrin

serves a major function in provid-
ing care for some of the refugees
who arrived previously but, be-
cause of age, health problems and
low income, continue to need
agency assistance and counsel-
ing. During the past year, the
agency has provided on-going
services to more than 230 per-
sons.
Samuel Lerner, executive di-
rector of JFS and RS, reported on
the recent evaluation of the
agency by the Council on Ac-
creditation of Services for
Families and Children, the na-
tional standard-setting body. The
agency was considered in full
Compliance in all areas on re-
view.

He also noted the institution of
in-home respite care program
during the past year supported by
the Area Agency on Aging 1-B
and by the Max M. Fisher Jewish
Community Foundation. During
1985, 68 different families were
provided respite care for the
caretakers of the aged.
He emphasized that this pro-
gram helps to prevent premature
institutionalization of the sick
and frail elderly who are being
cared for by a relative. By provid-
ing some respite for the
caretaker, they are better able to
provide the physical care of the ill
relative in their own homes. He
noted that the Max M. Fisher
Community Foundation granted
$27,500 as funds for the second
year of this project.
Lerner reported that 42 per-
cent of the time spent in direct

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