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June 06, 1986 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-06-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

22

Friday, June 6, 1986

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Children of Holocaust-survivors Association
In Michigan

Monday, June 16, 7:00 P.M.
Jewish Community Center - W. Bloomfield
Studio Theatre

Dutch rescuer who knew

Anne Frank and her

family in Amsterdam

and

Rev. James Lyons,

Director of the

Ecumenical Institute

Public Invited • No Admission Charge • Refreshments

For further information contact Charles Silow at 559-0545

KIDS,
BE AT THE FOOT OF THE MOUNTAIN
AS MOSES RECEIVES THE TEN COMMANDMENTS
You were there in spirit when it happened
3,298 years ago: be there in person this year.

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3,298 years ago, the Creator of the world gave his most precious

treasure, the Torah, to the Jewish people, at the foot of Mt. Sinai. All
Jewish souls ever to be born were Present at the giving of the Torah. Each
year, on the holiday of Shavuos, this historic event is reenacted. Attend
the Torah reading in the synagogue. BE THERE ON FRI. MORNING,
JUNE 13 (Call synagogue office for exact time.)

A note from your Parents will excuse you from school.

Sponsored by Lubavitch Foundation

Lavi Studies

Continued from Page 20

Topic: "The Righteous Gentiles"
Speakers: Yanni Blom,

l !

CAPITOL REPORT

aid package, for example, the
Reagan Administration has
asked Congress to appropriate
the same $1.8 billion in FMS
assistance contained in last
year's legislation. There was no
increase. And don't expect Con-
gress to take the initiative — as
in earlier years — to raise the
levels on its own.
The U.S. argument is that the
$400 million or $500 million a
year in FMS assistance ear-
marked in recent years for the
research and development of the
Lavi — in both the U.S. and
Israel — could be better spent
by Israel on other advanced
military systems. But Israeli of-
ficials disagree. They have their
own estimates to show that the
Pentagon's figures are wrong.
Some sensitive nerves on boths
sides have been exposed.
Meanwhile, Congress is get-
ting directly into the act. Its
watchdog Government Account-
ing Office (GAO) has been com-
missioned to do its own indepen-
dent' cost study of the Lavi.
Israeli Ministry of Defense of-
ficials in New York have wel-
comed this decision and have in-
formed the GAO that Israel will
fully cooperate with it.
A team of GAO analysts will
go to Israel soon to take a very
close look at the entire program.
"The sooner the better," an
Israeli official said. That GOA
report could determine the
ultimate future of the Lavi, ac-
cording to some savvy U.S. and
Israeli officials in Washington.
Pentagon officials are clearly
not impressed with the entire
Lavi project. They dispute
Israel's assertions that the Lavi
represents 21st century tech-
nology. They insist that it is no
more sophisticated than the F-16
and maybe not even as good.
Israel has already taken delivery
of or has on order 150 F-16's. The
Pentagon wants Israel to order
more.
"The Lavi is okay, but it's not
that great," an American expert
said, citing the performance
data presented by IAI officials
themselves. "Its capability is
standard."
When Rabin was offered the
F-16 coproduction option the
other day, he reminded his Pent-
agon hosts that Israel had
repeatedly appealed for exactly
that in the late 1970's. "Not
once, not twice, but three times,"
an Israeli official recalled. But
the U.S. flatly turned Israel's
requests down.
Reagan Administration of-
ficials concede the point but
note that the Carter Administra-
tion was then in office in Wash-
ington. "We have a different at-
titude on co-production with
Israel now," a Reagan appointee
said. "We have accepted Israel
as a strategic asset. Carter
didn't."
Israel, virtually everyone
agrees, has a clear need for 300
new fighters over the next 20
years. The Zakheim study ac-

cepted this as a given. Israel had
to make a basic decision six
years ago on the Lavi. Given the
Carter Administration's rejec-
tion of any real co-production,
approval for the new Israeli
fighter was granted.
The Zakheim study was com-
missioned in April 1985. More
than 20 experts from the Pen-
tagon, the State Department,
the Office of Management and
Budget, the National Security
Council and the intelligence
community were involved. They
concluded that Israel does in-
deed have a genuine need for 300
more planes. They also agreed
that Israel has the manpower
and technological capability to
build the Lavi. Where they
disagreed with Israel was on the
matter of cost. They also pre-
dicted that there would be some
real "slippage" in Israel's time-
table for getting the Lavi into
service. "In any such massive
project, there are always delays
and setbacks," one American of-
ficial involved in the study said.
IAI and the Ministry of De-
fense came back with its de-
tailed rebuttal. The Pentagon, in
the Zakheim study, had pre-
dicted that the Lavi would wind
up costing Israel some $22
million per plane. The IAI
estimate is closer to $15 million.
Israel argued that the Zak-
heim study was based on the
cost of labor in Israel being be-
tween $46-$48 an hour. Israel
said the real cost was $24-$26 an
hour. This discrepancy could ac-
count for as much as $2 million
per plane "fly-away cost,"
according to IAI officials. Israel
also said that the Zakheim
study was $2 million too high in
estimating the cost of material
per plane. Finally, the two sides
were far apart on the projected
costs of the American-made
Pratt and Whitney jet engines.

Stamp Depicts
Raoul Wallenberg

London (JTA) — A postage
stamp with the portrait of Raoul
Wallenberg will be issued by
Sweden next year as part of a
series of stamps honoring
Swedish nationals who lost their
lives while on international
humanitarian missions.
Wallenberg, a diplomat, is
credited with saving the lives of
100,000 Hungarian Jews when
he headed a special section of
the Swedish legation in
Budapest during World War II.
He was arrested by Soviet
authorities when the Red Army
entered Budapest in January
1945 and his fate remains un-
known.
Moscow insists he died in
prison in 1947 but there have
been persistent reports over the
years that he was seen alive and
may still be living. He would be
72.

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