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May 09, 1986 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-05-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

Friday, May 9, 1986

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

THE JEWISH NEWS

Serving Detroit's Metropolitan Jewish Community
with distinction for four decades.

Editorial and Sales offices at 20300 Civid Center Dr.,
Suite 240, Southfield, Michigan 48076-4138
Telephone (313) 354-6060

PUBLISHER: Charles A. Buerger
.
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER: Arthur M. Horwitz
EDITOR EMERITUS: Philip Slomovitz
EDITOR: Gary Rosenblatt
CONSULTANT: Carmi M. Slomovitz
ART DIRECTOR: Kim Muller-Thym
NEWS EDITOR: Alan Hitsky
LOCAL NEWS EDITOR: Heidi Press
LOCAL COLUMNIST: Danny Raskin

OFFICE STAFF:
Lynn Fields
Marlene Miller
Dharlene Norris
Phyllis Tyner
Pauline Weiss
Ellen Wolfe

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES:
Lauri Biafore
Rick Nessel
Danny Raskin

PRODUCTION:
Donald Cheshure
Cathy Ciccone
Curtis Deloye
Ralph Orme

1986 by The Detroit Jewish News (US PS 275-520)
Second Class postage paid at Southfield, Michigan and additional mailing offices.
Subscriptions: 1 year - $21 — 2 years - $39 — Out of State - $23 — Foreign - $35

CANDLELIGHTING AT 8:21 P.M.

VOL. LXXXIX, NO. 11

Message From Israel

Prime Minister Shimon Peres sends the following greeting for Israel
Independence Day. The celebration will be culminated locally May 18 at the
Maple-Drake Jewish Community Center.
The journey of our people to spiritual and political rebirth in its own
land has not all been paved with joy. This is the longest and most
revolutionary journey undertaken by any people, any time in the history of
mankind. This is a journey which has not yet been completed. While we may
perhaps already pronounce the benediction on deliverance, the time is not
yet ripe to congratulate ourselves on a task completed.
The journey is not yet over; neither have all the controversies been
resolved — first between us, here in Israel, and our brethren throughout the
world. At the same time, we will continue to maintain the unity of the
people, despite its pluralistic character, and will continue to strive to
assemble all Jews, from all corners of the world, here in Israel. It is only in
our historic homeland that we have attained national freedom,
self-fulfillment, and true, unqualified pride and self-respedt for every Jew;
both as a human being, and as a Jew.
We believe that the construct which has been created here in Israel, in
the last hundred years, is not the sum total of declaration or of changes —
but rather the result of vision, of hard work, of stubborn principles. Those
who remain true to the path of pragmatic Zionism — know that this is the
most humane course of action the world has ever known.
The national unity government, after 20 months in office, can today
credit itself with impressive achievements, in important areas of life. The
withdrawal of the IDF from Lebanon served to consolidate our national
security, while safeguarding the lives of our soldier-sons. We succeeded in
halting the inflationary spiral — . which threatened to sweep the national
economy into the abyss. We are now on the threshold of a new economic
momentum — which will comprise the encouragement of exports, the
replacement of imports, and a structural reorganization of the economy.
On the political level, we have broadened the gateway between Israel
and Egypt — and, despite attempts to intimidate and to terrorize us, both
countries remain resolved to deepen the ties between us as a prelude to a
comprehensive peace in the region. The Hashemite King has also come a
long way to meet us on the road to the negotiating table, while the PLO
continues to prove that it is an obstacle to peace, as we have postulated. The
present government of Israel can also pride itself on the fact that, in its time,
internal tensions in the country have been greatly reduced: between
Ashkenazim and Sephardim, between the different political parties,
between religious and secular elements, between Jews and Arabs. Israel's
image in the world has also improved. Leader .s and governments are
attentive to our views; they appreciate our firm stand against terrorism; and
they understand that our continuing struggle, here in Israel, is based not
only on power, but also on justice.
The State of Israel represents a composite of three elements: continuity,
change, and revolution. Continuity has kept us faithful to the Bible: The
Lord is exalted, for He dwelleth on high. He hath filled Zion with justice and
righteousness." (Isaiah 33:5). Change is superimposing a new physical layer
on our ancient, historical foundations, without allowing planning and
deliberation to take place of daring and boldness. While our revolution has
been directed against the attempt by the nations of the world to imprison
our spirit in the ghettos.
From Jerusalem, the eternal capital of our people, we issue to you a
clear and explicit call: come and live with us in Israel. Come and maintain
with us Jewish continuity. Come and consolidate with us demographic
change. Come and carry out together with us the Zionist revolution.

OP-ED

For Good Or III, TV News
Shapes Perception Of Israel

BY DR. BARUCH GITLIS
Special To The Jewish News

Most Americans form their opin-
ions about nations, people, issues and
events from what they see and hear
on television. So it is not surprising
(although it distresses me deeply)
that many people in the United States
have an erroneous image of Israel.
This distorted and unwarranted
view is largely the result of the pre-
sentation of Israel, in words and pic-
tures, that viewers get from watching
the major TV networks — ABC, CBS
and NBC.
The view of Israel as a swagger-
ing tough guy and harsh occupying
power, with little concern for the
rights and feelings of Arabs living
under its thumb, has been especially
evident since the Lebanese war. But
the anti-Israel picture projected by
the networks began nearly 20 years
ago, when TV stepped up its coverage
of the Middle East and decided that it
would give "both sides of the story."
At the Harry Karren Institute for
Propaganda Analysis at Bar-Ilan
University in Israel, we have been
analyzing American and other TV
news broadcasts for the past five
years. What is particularly disturbing
is not that Israel no longer enjoys its
former status — most of us are famil-
iar with the switch from "David" to
"Goliath" in the public perception of
the Jewish state — but that the
crimes and outrages committed
against Israel and the Jewish people
are now said to be perpetrated by Is-
rael in its treatment of Arabs.
Thus, we see the use of such emo-
tionally charged words as "Holocaust"
and "genocide" applied to Israel's
policies and actions. "Apartheid" has
been used to describe Israel's treat-
ment of black Jews rescued by Israel
from famine and oppression in
Ethiopia.
It is the supreme irony —

.

epitomized by the infamous Zionism-
is-racism resolution adopted by the
United Nations — to accuse Israel
and the Jews of the very crimes per-
petrated against them. This form of
role-reversal has proven surprisingly
effective. It is a measure of the world's
misunderstanding of words like
"Holocaust", "genocide" and "racism"

The television networks, of
course, see themselves as
impartial and objective in
their reporting about
Israel and the Middle
East.

that they are used so readily and ac-
cepted so immediately when used re-
peatedly to describe what Jews do
rather than what has been done to
them.
The television networks, of
course, see themselves as impartial
and objective . in their reporting about
Israel and the Middle East. But our
monitoring of their output — hun-
dreds of hours of TV network news per
year — shows that, however uncon-
sciously, they continue to present
news of the Middle East in a way that
demeans Israel and its policies.
A case in point is TV's insistence
on interpreting the news to help the
viewer understand the meaning of
events," or words to that effect. Thus,
when CBS News reported the story of
the recent bomb blast aboard TWA
840 that killed four Americans, a long
segment sought to explain what it
was that drove Palestinians to com-
mit such brutal acts. The footage ac-
companying this explanation showed
the Sabra and Shatila refugee camps


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