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May 09, 1986 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-05-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Culture Series
Opening Here

Beth El
Experience.

Page 26

Page 41

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1

THE SWISH NEWS

THIS ISSUE 50`

Federation Targets
Oak Park, Southfield

BY ALAN HITSKY

News Editor

The Jewish Welfare Federation is
planning and the United Jewish
Charities has funded "The Neighbor-
hood Project" to enhance Jewish •
neighborhoods and institutions in the
Oak Park - Southfield' area.
UJC has committed $250,000
over a three-year period to the projed,
which will include assistance to
Jewish • home buyers in Jewish
neighborhoods, establishment of real
estate seminars for home purchasers
and real estate agents, establishment
of neighborhood associations, contacts
with area businessmen and sponsor-
ship of community festivals.
Jewish Welfare Federation
President Joel Tauber announced
that a full-time staff coordinator
would be employed by Federation to
work with the area's Jewish com-
munal agencies, schools, civic, ethnic,
religious and governmental bodies in

MAY 9, 1986

SERVING DETROIT'S METROPOLITAN JEWISH COMMUNITY

developing projects for the targeted
neighborhoods. The coordinator is ex-
pected to begin working June 1.
Tauber said nearly half of De-
troit's Jewish•community lives in the
cities of Oak Park and Southfield.
Further, there are nearly 50
synagogues, Federation agency
structures and Jewish organization
offices in the area. "We could never
hope to duplicate the quality and
number of buildings anywhere else,"
said Tauber.
• He also noted the many stores
and businesses that cater to Jewish
clientele and their special needs that
are not to be found elsewhere in De-
troit. "It is a wonderful area with a
unique Jewish ambience, and we
would like to work with the neighbor-
hoods in helping preserve that ambi-
ence." Tauber said the program will
seek the active participation of com-
munity leaders in neighboring Hun-
tington Woods.

Continued on Page 25

1.696 Freeway:
Outflow and Inflow?

BY ROBYN KLEEREKOPER

Special to The Jewish News

Editor's Note: Many factors influ-
ence the stability of a neighborhood.
Following up The Jewish News
Close-Up Story of Oct. 26, 1984, this
article looks at the effects of the In-
terstate 696 freeway construction on
Jewish neighborhoods in the Hun-
tington Woods - Oak Park - Southfield
area. In the coming months ; we intend
to explore other factors influencing
these neighborhoods.
According to Bob Tiura, om-
budsman for the Michigan Depart-
ment of Transportation (MDOT),
Huntington Woods construction of
I-696 is virtually done. Work crews
are digging along Eleven Mile Road
in Southfield, Lathrup Village and
the Ten Mile sections in Royal Oak
Township, Oak Park, Royal Oak and
Pleasant Ridge. The segment in
Southfield from Eleven Mile, crossing
Greenfield Road into Royal Oak

Township and Oak Park, has yet to
have the ground broken. The entire
link is expected to be completed by
late 1989.
In this last 7.9 miles of the free-
way, the humanizing elements are to
be found in berms and decks, proposed

Continued on Page 14

Births
Business
'Classified Ads
Editorials
Engagements
Obituaries
Purely Commentary
Danpy Raskin
Singles
Synagogues
Women

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70
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2
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66

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