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May 02, 1986 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-05-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

10 Friday, May 2, 1986

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

LOCAL NEWS

JCCouncil To Hear
Coleman Young

Detroit Mayor Coleman A. for him, and for our community,"
Young will discuss black-Jewish Cohan said. "After all, Mayor
relations at the Jewish Commu- Young is the pre-eminent politi-
nity Council delegate assembly cal leader in this part of Michi-
May 15.
gan." •
The assembly will be held at 8
The first black mayor of De-
p.m. at Cong. Shaarey Zedek and
troit,
Young has often been con-
is open to the public.
Young was invited by Council troversial during his 12 years in
president Leon Cohan, a long- office. Cohan said some of the
time friend who met with the Council delegates at first ex-
mayor informally a month ago. pressed surprise at the invitation
"We talked about issues involv- to the mayor, "but a lot more
ing the Jewish community and people were pleased" by the invi-
the general community," Cohan tation.
said. "I invited him to speak,
In addition to the mayor's ad-
pointing out that this was an dress, the assembly agenda in-
opportunity to meet a large cludes election of Jewish Com-
cross-section of the Jewish com- munity Council officers and
munity." The Council represents ' members of its executive commit-
300 Jewish communla organiza- tee, and presentation of the Wal-
tions in the Detroit metropolitan ter E. Klein Award to a local
area.
Jewish youth group for outstand-
"It is an important opportunity • ing social action programming.

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Strike At Libya Ends
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CHRIS GERSTEN
Special to The Jewish News

After the defeat of Hitler's
forces in the battle of El Alemein,
British Prime Minister Winston
S. Churchill reflected on the im-
plications of the allied victory.
"This is not the end," he said of
the warfagainst Nazi Germany.
"It is not even the beginning of ,
the end. But it is, perhaps, the
end of the beginning."
President Reagan's election in
1980 marked "the end of the be-
ginning" of the debilitating ef-
fects of the Vietnam syndrome,
the paralysis that overcame U.S.
defense and .foreign policy after
the Vietnam War. The American
people had elected in President
Reagan a man whom they be-
lieved would restore American
pride, American strength and the
primacy of America among the
world's democracies.
But Ronald Reagan's election
did not bring with it the reckless
use of military force anticipated
by his opponents on the left. For .
five years, his Administration
went to great lengths to avoid
using force when U.S. interests
could be protected by other
means. The President tried
numerous peaceful means to
combat the increasingly frequent
terrorist attacks against Ameri-
can citizens, fearing perhaps that
military action might provoke a
public story that would under-
mine his support in the nation.
But these approaches, re-
peatedly failed to bear fruit, as
our allies refused to join the effort
to curtail the growing scourge of
state-sponsored terror. As Col-
onel Qaddafi continued to call
America's bluff over the
President's threats of a military
response, and continued to direct
terrorist attacks against Ameri-

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For years, the fear of public op-
position restrained the use of
military force even in the most
testing' of circumstahces. When
attacked, the Marines withdrew
from Lebanon; when TWA flight
847 and the Achille Lauro were
hijacked, America's response was
limited. By ordering a carefully-
planned and executed strike
against terrorist training and
support facilities in Libya,
President Reagan has helped
change the perception of America
from that of a power whose hands
are tied to that of one willing and
able to use fOrce when provoked.

For years, the fear of
public opposition
restrained the use of
force even in the most
testing of
circumstances.

However, President Reagan's
measured and skillful use of force
against Libya did more than
show that the U.S. government is
willing to exercise power. It also
demonstrated that the American
people will strongly support mili-
tary action when' their patience

has been exhausted and alterna-
tives yield no result.
11
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Chris

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cans, Mr. Reagan recognized that
the United States had to respond,
and had to respond with force.

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