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April 18, 1986 - Image 56

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-04-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

56

Friday, April 18, 1986

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

SPRUNG SHAPE-UP hesSPring
spr iingt
...d an SAVE!
$7500 Discount*

PEOPLE

'Elsewhere's' Lloyd:
Human Interaction

BY MICHAEL ELKIN

Special to The Jewish News

1•YEAR•WOMEN'S HEALTH CLUB MEMBERSHIP

During the month of April, take
advantage of the JCC'S SPRING
SHAPE-UP $75.00 DISCOUNT. Enjoy
the fabulous Health Club facilities:
Sauna, whirlpool, nautilus exercise
room, pools, track, racquetball and
squash courts. There is a large
selection of SHAPE-UP classes
— at no extra charge!

Call Today!

661-10001

extensions
166, 167

JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
OF METROPOLITAN DETROIT
6600 West Maple Road
West Bloomfield, MI 48033

. 4,

Q

• U
u

0

'This offer not valid for
perions who have been
Health Club Members
during the past,12 months.

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t A 8' f

Norman Lloyd as Dr. Auschlander checks the chart of a former

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sweetheart (Geraldine Fitzgerald) in a recent "St. Elsewhere episode.

aft

Paging Dr. Auschlander!
Norman Lloyd answers the call
each week on "St. Elsewhere" as
the benign liver specialist who is
suffering himself from liver
cancer. Lloyd's is one of 'the more
effective performances in the
award-winning NBC-TV hospital
drama that pulses with excite-
ment.
But the NBC-TV series doesn't
rely on car crashes — unless you
count a misguided gurney bump-

If *

A a a 4 4
ta a N A

it 41,

The Haggadah was read.
The goodbyes were said.

brim' bar
brim' n

pit a4fINATEDa°

Cup after cup,
The coffee was Brim.®

Fill your cup to the rim
144th the richness of Brim.®

ft

COM'

DARK
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c 1985 General Foods Corporation

GENERAL
FOODS

ing into a wall — or blonde
bombshells — unless you consider
Nurse Rosenthal's right hook a
formidable weapon — for its ac-
tion.
"St. Elsewhere" culls its action
from human interaction. It is the
personal crises — and celebra-
tions — of its diverse staff that
helps make this weekly examina-
tion of a big city hospital such su-
perb drama.
And when it comes to crises,
Auschlander has had a few of his
own. Now fighting off the ravages
of his cancer, Auschlander
learned early on how to play the
warrior. His early bouts with
anti-Semitism taught him that
the milk of human kindness too
often curdles with use. •
Actor Lloyd certainly identifies
with the gentle doctor he por-
trays. "I recall anti-Semitism
being generally rife in my young
acting days in New York al-

though," he adds, "I didn't per-
sonally experience any."
Nevertheless, Auschlander and
what Lloyd describes as "the
Jewish immigrant experience"
strike a chord in the actor. "It
touches within my own experi-
ences," he says.
Those experiences center on a
love of tennis, a love of fine music
and a streetwise New York up-
bringing. "I was what you would
call a street kid," says Lloyd, who
enjoyed a good game of stick ball
at the drop of a broom.
There was also the common
Jewish heritage, one in which
family played a central role. The
actor, in that sweet, soothing lul-
laby of a voice, fondly remembers
visits to his grandparents who
lived on the Lower East Side.
But Lloyd calls on more than
past childhood recollections to
give shape and tone to Auschlan-
der. He bases his character on his
own doctor, Donald Hoytt. "Both
share that sense • of humor, that
bemused quality of looking at
life," he says. "Auschlander has
seen it all."
Indeed, so has Lloyd. At the age
of 71, he has built an incredible
repertoire of films and.television
work. A protege of Le Gallienne
Civic Repertory Theater, Lloyd
made his Broadway debut in
Noah and starred in the Federal

Theater's Living Newspaper.

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