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April 04, 1986 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4 Friday, April 4, 1986

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

THE JEWISH NEWS

Serving Detroit's Metropolitan Jewish Community
with distinction for four decades.

Editorial and Sales offices at 20300 Civic Center Dr.,
Suite 240, Southfield, Michigan 48076-4138
Telephone (313) 354 6060

OP-ED

Our Wonderful 'Friends'
In Troubled Kingdom Of Oil

-

PUBLISHER: Charles A. Buerger
EDITOR EMERITUS: Philip Slomovitz
EDITOR: Gary Rosenblatt
CONSULTANT: Carmi M. Slomovitz
ART DIRECTOR: Kim Muller-Thym
NEWS EDITOR: Alan Hitsky
LOCAL NEWS EDITOR: Heidi Press
LOCAL COLUMNIST: Danny Raskin

OFFICE STAFF:
Lynn Fields
Marlene Miller
Dharlene Norris
Phyllis Tyner
Pauline Weiss
Ellen Wolfe

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES:
Lauri Biafore
Allan Craig
Rick Nessel
Danny Raskin

PRODUCTION:
Donald Cheshure
Cathy Ciccone
Curtis Deloye
Ralph Orme

©1986 by The Detroit Jewish News (US PS 275-520)
Second Class postage paid at Southfield, Michigan and additional mailing offices.
Subscriptions: 1 year - $21 — 2 years - $39 — Out of State - $23 — Foreign - $35

CANDLELIGHTING AT 6:43 P.M.

VOL. LXXXIX, NO. 6

The Waldheim Record

The charges keep coming and Kurt Waldheim keeps denying them.
The former Secretary General of the United Nations, who is running for
President of Austria, has insisted for four decades that he was never a
Nazi. His official biographies and his own recent memoirs say that after
being wounded while serving as a conscript on the Eastern front in 1941,
he returned to Vienna to study for a law degree.
It now turns out that he joined a Nazi student union in April, 1938,
joined the Brownshirts on November 18 of that year, nine days after
Kristallnacht, and served in the Balkans in 1942 and 1943 on the staff of
a general who was later executed for war crimes. Waldheim now contends
that he served only as an interpreter, but in any event his services
earned him a decoration from the Nazi puppet regime in Croatia.
If there is nothing to his background to be ashamed of, why did Mr.
Waldheim go to such lengths to cover up his past? He is now saying that
the charges being made by the World Jewish Congress are a political ploy
to hurt him in the upcoming Austrian election. "For 40 years nobody
cared about all this," Waldheim told an interviewer recently. "And now,
because I am running for the Presidency of Austria, suddenly somebody
digs in and produces accusations which are completely untrue ... The
timing of it is perfect. For 40 years these things have rested."
Isn't that the point, though? No one is accusing Waldheim of war
crimes. But a man who consistently assured the public that he never
belonged to any Nazi organization, that indeed he opposed them, has
retreated to the position that he never knew of any atrocities. The
evidence emerging in newly uncovered documents from German and
Yugoslav archives, including photos of Waldheim with German and
Italian officers, indicates that he was an intelligence officer. Those at the
United Nations expressing shock that the man who led the organization
for a decade was at best a liar should re-consider. After all, it is only
fitting for such a man to head a morally bankrupt world body.
The lesson here is that the truth will out. Even if, as Kurt Waldheim
says, "for 40 years these things have rested."

It Did Happen Here

It was incredibly easy. The electorate was uninformed and apathetic,
the political establishment was complacent, the press was looking the
other way. And so the bland-looking, quiet-talking candidates of the
radical right ran for election in the primaries and got in. They, not the
candidates with the foreign-sounding or Jewish names, were voted onto
the ballot by an ignorant and only mildly anti-Semitic populace who
turned out to do its duty as citizens half-heartedly and in small numbers.
The conservatives were well-funded, highly organized and
wonderfully energetic. What they did not spend on campaigning, they
made up for in aggressive electioneering.
Scary? A scenario from the last days of the Weimar Republic? No,
Chicago two weeks ago, when Lyndon LaRouche's candidates slipped
easily onto the Democratic ticket.
And suddenly, bringing with them the loathsome baggage of
neo-Nazism, anti-Semitism and political paranoia, the lunatic fringe was
there, climbing the rungs to the seats of power.
Scary? You bet. We have been warned. It happened here, in the
United States, in Chicago. Given the right conditions, it could happen
anywhere, even in Detroit.

EZEKIEL LEIKIN
Special to The Jewish News

President Reagan has struck a
mighty blow for freedom and democ-
racy. In a recent statement, the Ad-
ministration has committed the U.S.
toward the furtherance of "demo-
cratic revolution," which political
observers viewed as a "significant
force for international human
rights."
To counter the notion previously
articulated by UN Ambassador
Jeane Kirkpatrick, who had drawn a
distinction between "friendly
authoritarians" and "hostile totalita-
rians," the newly-unveiled position
paper stipulates that the U.S. is op-
posed to all dictatorships — on the
right or left — and will henceforth
gauge each country's conduct on the
basis of its score-card on human
rights. Thus, academic and political
think-tanks will be, undoubtedly
kept busy monitoring America's
"democratic revolution" and its ap-
plication to U.S. foreign policy.
One question likely to tax the
resourcefulness of Administration
spokesmen is whether the "demo-
cratic revolution" is relevant to
Mideast despots, especially those
labelled "friends of the U.S."
It seems patently clear, that
what distinguishes Saudi Arabia's
King Fand from the deposed Fer-
dinand Marcos and Jean-Claude
Duvalier is the towering fact that
the Saudi monarch is sitting on top
of the world's largest reservoir of oil,
which in terms of "real politik" out-
. weighs such extraneous considera-
tions as freedom and human rights.
As former U.S. representative at the
UN (now Senator) Daniel Patrick
Moynihan phrased it, even frowning
at "friendly" despots like King Fand

Ezekiel Leikin is a writer and lecturer,
and executive vice president of the
Zionist Organization of America -
Detroit District.

is a "luxury" the U.S. can ill afford.
Hence, Saudi Arabia has been kept
"off limits" to U.S. strictures, al-
though its credentials as a pro-
American country have never been

King Fand:
The oily throne may be slipping.

subjected to close scrutiny by U.S.
policy-makers.
Within a matter of weeks, the
U.S. Congress will be called upon to
buttress U.S. - Saudi friendship by
approving the Administration's plan
to provide the Saudis with $354 mil-
lion worth of advanced American
missiles.
Clifford Hallam, who spent some
time as a teacher in Saudi Arabia,
offered a perceptive picture of Saudi
society (Commentary, February
1986):
"No one in Riyadh holds a brief
for due process, open trials or a free
press . . . judging from the ethos of

Continued on Page 20

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