100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

March 14, 1986 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-03-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

30 Friday, March 14, 1986

THE SEVENTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON THE HOLOCAUST
"FAITH IN GOD, FAITH IN EACH OTHER"

FOCUS

AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

(All programs are free and open to the public) •

Sunday, March 16 — Keynote Address

"CAN WE BELIEVE IN GOD AFTER THE HOLOCAUST?"

7:00 p.m. in the Rackham Amphitheater (4th floor)
Professor Steven Katz, Cornell University

Monday, March 17

"ETHICAL CHOICES WITHIN THE DEATH CAMPS:
TESTIMONIES OF HOLOCAUST SURVIVORS"

7:00 p.m., Pendleton Room in the Michigan Union
Professor Lawrence Langer, Simmons College

Tuesday, March 18

"'THE COURAGE TO CARE':
A DOCUMENTARY ABOUT CHRISTIANS WHO CHOSE TO
HELP JEWS DURING THE HOLOCUAST"

7:30 p.m., Natural Science Building Auditorium
Nominated for an Academy Award as Best Short Documentary.
Premier Ann Arbor showing. Free.
Co-producer Sister Carol Rittner,. Mercy College in Detroit

Wednesday, March 19

"ARGUING WITH GOD, REFLECTING ON GOOD & EVIL:
AN EVENING WITH SURVIVORS"'

7:30 p.m., Rackham Amphitheater (4th floor)

For More Information, Call The B'nai B'rith

Hillel Foundation 663-3336

GRAND OPENING

March 20th.

,,,e,,
. ._, 4 .,...
. .

0

1)

0

(

/

.

C. , ntinued from preceding page
months S}'ahal has been trying to
arrange for a decent burial.
Two lessons stand out in the
problematic legacy of the MDP:
Don't mix philanthropy with
cost-benefit analysis, since
energy development planning is
complicated enough without in-
jecting the temptation of playing
to the crowd. Don't create a situa-
tion where the body charged with
studying the feasibility of a proj-
ect has such a strong interest in
its implementation that it
monopolizes and manipulates key
data to further this end.
The latest steps taken by the
Energy Ministry push the pros-

pects of the Med-Dead farther into
the future. By that time, nuclear
power, synthetic fuel from shale
oil and new solar energy systems
may well become fixtures on Is-
rael's energy scene, thus reducing
the need for the grandiose project.
By then the dream of the Med-
Dead will have been reduced to a
curiosity, recalled by tour-guides
as their buses pass the explorat-
ory tunnel and Canal Founders
slab down at the Dead Sea.

Charles Hoffman, a reporter for
the Jerusalem Post, recently re-
turned to Israel after spending a
year as a shaliach in America.

Canal Founders
Knew The Score

Detroiters took an active role in
the funding of the feasibility
studies for the Mediterranean-
to-Dead Sea Canal project. Some
37 Canal Founders in Michigan
loaned Israel Bonds a total of $4
million for the project.
Hershell Wais, Michigan direc-
tor for State of Israel Bonds, told
The Jewish News that Sam
Cohodas of Ishpeming, David
Hermelin and the late Paul Zuc-
kerman were the most active in
promoting the project locally.
"When Israelis came into town,"
Wais said, "those three, and Irwin
Green, arranged the meetings
with local people."
Hermelin, when asked if there
was negative reaction when the
project was placed on hold, em-
phasized that Detroiters were
made to understand from the be-
ginning that "we were undertak-
ing to raise the $100 million seed
money for a feasibility study, to
see if it was viable. Keep in mind

that when this started energy was
at an all-time high and projected
to go up to $100 per barrel in the
near future. Three years later the
trend reversed."
The war in Lebanon and the
subsequent downturn in Israel's
economy also were factors,
Hermelin said, and finally Israel
had to choose between developing
the Lavie jet fighter and the
Canal.
"One or two people may have
been unhappy with the decision,"
said Hermelin, who is a national
chairman of Israel Bonds. "After
all, people want to see something
built that they were part of. And it
still could be built someday ...
maybe.
"But in Detroit especially," few
people were unhappy with the Is-
raeli decision on the Canal "be-
cause these are major Israel Bond
buyers and they continue to be.
They know the money is going to
help the Israeli economy."

Waldheim Linked To Nazis

.

4

Med-Dead

Hours: Monday-Saturday 10a.m.- 6p.m.
I
Thursday 10 a.m. - 9 pm.
41111
1

800 N. Woodward Ave.,
Suite 101, Birmingham, MI. 48011
(313) 645-0311

New York (JTA) — Former
United Nations Secretary Gen-
eral Kurt Waldheim served on
the staff of a German army gen-
eral in 1943 who was described
as "perhaps more implicated in
Jewish deportations than any
other Wehrmacht commander,"
the World Jewish Congress re-
vealed.
The documents follow the dis-
closure in Vienna that Wal-
dheim, now a conservative can-
didate for the presidency of Au-
stria, had an active Nazi past.
Documents published in Vienna
show Waldheim in his youth
was a member of the Nazi SA
and the National Socialist Stu-
dent Organization.
Waldheim had denied mem-
bership in either, though he
conceded that he had in fact
joined the groups in order to
protect his family. Waldheim's
association with the SA was in
his pursuit of horseback riding.
The records of Waldheim's de-
Nazification process in 1946 con-
firmed that his association with
the SA was solely in pursuit of
his passion for horseback riding.
The WJC documents disclose
that Waldheim served on Gen.

Alexander Loehr's Staff at
Salonika, Greece, in March
1943, when, at the same time,
Wehrmacht trains were carrying
2,000-2,500. Jews to Auschwitz
every day. Waldheim has denied
knowing of any deportations.
"I regret these things most
deeply, but I have to repeat that
it is really the first time that I
hear such things happened,"
Waldheim told the New York
Times. "I never heard or learned
anything of this while I was
there. I hear for the first time
that there were deportations of
Jews from there."
According to the WJC, docu-
ments and testimony at the
Nuremberg trial established
that Loehr and personnel under
his command supervised the
1943 deportations to Auschwitz
of the large Jewish community
in Salonika. The operation, con-
ducted with SS assistance,
began in mid-March 1943 and
was largely over by mid-May, by
which time more than 42,000
men, women and children had
been transported to Poland,
where they were gassed shortly
after arrival at the death camp.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan