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January 31, 1986 - Image 45

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-01-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

46 Friday, January 31, 1986

r

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT?
Seymour Schwartz
Of Course! 356-8525

INVITATIONS?
. Hattie Schwartz
Of Course! 352-7387

L

DOCTOR
DISCO

• THE FINEST IN MUSIC • 1 MAN BAND
• COMICS • SPEAKERS
• DANCERS • CLOWNS • MIME
• VENTRILOQUIST • MAGIC
• CARICATURE ARTISTS

FOR THE BEAUTIFUL INVITATIONS
PEOPLE TALK ABOUT

HEBREW COPY AVAILABLE

"the specialist in
party directing"

_,Perks For Your Parties_

HOUSE CALLS
Podiatrist,
DR. KATHY DUZAK

CALL:

JEFF
855-5571

271-6210

*all insurances accepted

NEWS

CHERYL'S NEEDLEPOINT

• Individual Instructions
• Handpainted Canvases
• Variety of Yarns

-661-8094

—Discounted --,-

CHERYL SLAIM

By Appt. Only

Yarns
Instructions
Original Designs
Finishing
Handcrafted Sweaters

Be'Lynn's Coiffners & Fashions

HAIR DESIGNS FOR MEN & WOMEN
24150 Novi Rd.
Novi, MI

et
M

HOURS:
MON. 8:00 am-6:00 pm
TUES. 4:30 am-5:00 pm
W-T-F 4:30 am-9:00 pm
SAT. 4:30 am-3:00 pm

NEW CLIENTS ONLY!
EXP 3-8-86 w/ad

Lingerie and Accessories

DESIGNER SHOE OUTLET

For Men & women

BRAND NAME
SHOES & BOOTS
AT DISCOUNT mom
SAVE UP TO 75%!

CRUISEWEAR
ARRIVING DAILY

KRIM SWAM Nut b
Mori lk & 14, Fn. Mils
90111116.11 PUB

Located at Kitty Wagner's Salon

• 851-5766

ORCHARD MALL
Mon.-Sat. 10-5 855-2114
West Bloomfield

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Tues.-Sot. 10 to 5:30 p.m.

Wed. 10 to 9 p.m.

DICKENS
BOUTIQUE

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851-8850

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Closed Mondays

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WHO DOESN'T WANT TO SEE HERSELF
COMING AND GOING

the BLOOM NEVER FADES
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We offer a complete Wardrobe of Designer Clothing from Canada

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Open Daily 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday Evening to 9 p.m. Sunday Noon to 5.
37 CHATHAM ST. E., DOWNTOWN WINDSOR, PHONE 1.5194524020
40% Premium on U.S. Cash

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151-4190
551-8882

SELECT DRESSES, COATS, SUITS, SLAX, BLOUSES.

Stormy Congressional
Session Expected

Washington (JTA) — Con-
gress is back at work last week
after a month-long recess, and
the returning legislators will im-
mediately set out to resume
some old unresolved battles and
to wage a few new oness in a ses-
sion that is expected to be the
stormiest since President Rea•
gan took office.
The issues of special concern
to many in the Jewish commun-
ity are myriad and diverse,
ranging from tax reform to arms
sales for Arab countries, and
from school prayer to an inter-
national agreement barring
genocide.
But perhaps the greatest
source of anticipation in
Washington right now is to be
found in legislation ,already
adopted at the end of last ses-
sion. The controversial Gramm-
Rudman budget balancing law
will force the Administration to
reduce the federal deficit in
several stages over the next five
years, with automatic cuts ap-
plied to government programs if
Congress fails to meet its man-
dated targets.
The Administration has an-
nounced that the law sill re-
quire a budget-trimming for
fiscal year 1986 of $11.7 billion.
The cuts, half of which must be
taken from the military budget
and half from non-military
spending, will go into effect
automatically on March 1, un-
less laws are enacted before then
that would reduce the deficit by
the same amount.
Reagan is expected to present
Congress with a budget for 1987
sometime next month that will
meet the legislated requirement
of cutting more than $50 billion
more out of the nation's deficit.
But if Congress and the White
House fail to thrash out a final
plan, automatic cuts will go into
effect across the board next fall.
Of particular concern to many
Jewish organizations is the fate
of domestic social programs
destined to feel the sharp edge
of the Gramm-Rudman budget-
cutting scissors. Jewish groups
active in promoting social
welfare programs fear that the
expected cuts this year will be
devastating for many of the
nation's poor, among them
elderly Jews.
Jewish Federations are "in
jeopardy of losing millions of
dollars," when the cuts take
effect, according to Ellen -Wit-
man, Legislative Director at the
Washington office of the Coun-
cil of Jewish Federations.
The Administration has
already withheld grants, nor-
mally renewed on Janu: ,,, for
refugee resettlement 1,,,s oney
which is used by • eration-
funded agencies primarily to
resettle Jewish immigrants
from the Soviet Union and
Eastern Europe, according to
Whitman. Other Federation-'
funded programs that can ex-
pect to suffer are housing pro-
grams, foster care and adoption

services and assistance projects
to the elderly.
Many Jews already living
below or near the poverty line
are among those who will be
badly hurt by social service cuts
in programs administered by
Jewish and non-Jewish agencies
alike, Marc Pearl, Washington
representative of the American
Jewish Congress, pointed out.
He noted that 16 to 20 percent
of American Jews are either cur-
rently below the poverty line or
would fall below in the event of
another recession.
Another source of anxiety for
many Jewish individuals and
organizations is the tax reform
issue which will almost certain-

Budget trimming

and tax code worry

Jewish groups.

ly be taken up by the Senate
Finance Committee early on in
the new session.

The House passed a bill to
revise the tax code just before
winter recess. To the relief of
many Jewish organizations it
did not include a provision in a
similar plan proposed by the
Treasury Department that
would have prevented nonitem-
izing taxpayers from deducting
any contributions to charitable
institutions. The House version
would permit the deductions
only after the first $100.
A coalition of some 600
Jewish and non-Jewish philan-
thropic bodies involved in
welfare, cultural, educational
and religious programs, has
vigorously opposed the Treas-
ury's proposal, claiming it
would substantially reduce
donations to charity. The
Jewish Federations, for exam-
ple, which raise more than $600
million a year, could lose, ac-
cording to a study by the coali-
tion, over a sixth of their
average ammallearnings.

As the tax filing deadline ap-
proaches, Israel Bond holders
will almost certainly be relieved
by of a new tax burden of which
most are undoubtedly unaware.
A proVision of the 1984 Deficit
Reduction Act would require
lenders to pay tax on the full
amount of interest they would
get if the loans had been made
at prevailing market rates.
If Israel Bonds are not exemp-
ted from the 1984 act, Bond
holders would be required to pay
tax on more interest than they
actuallyearned, since the bonds'
four percent interest falls well
below the current approximate
market rate of ten percent. This
could result in a loss of potential
bond purchasers, some members
of Congress have pointed out.

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