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January 17, 1986 - Image 34

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-01-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

3•1,1

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34 Friday, January 17, 1986

H

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Jolts.

NEWS

Ev iteiter

Michigan Hate

Continued from Page 1

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sues as excessive or inciting,
saying that increased coverage
helps "sensitize the non-Jewish
community" to Jewish concerns.
The Michigan regioxi director
also said the techniques used by
the ADL in collating data tend
to leave room for leeway in the
final tabulations because the
League does not take serial at-
tacks into account. "In analyz-
ing them, they have to be looked
at as one incident," Lobenthal
said, "even though we have to
report them as three separate
attacks."
According to the ADL direc-
tor, graffiti daubings at an Ann
Arbor synagogue, a University
of Michigan library and a U-M
fratern4 house last year were
all related, but recorded by the
ADL as separate incidents.
Lobenthal said a number of
national hate groups'were mak-
ing their presence felt in the
state and that the ADL is
monitoring the activities of
these groups. An October meet-
ing of the Aryan Nations hate
group drew 200 people to the
northern Michigan city of
Cohoctah, according to the ADL
director.
"People like Bob Miles (who
coordinates Aryan Nations ac-
tivities in the state) aren't the
ones running around painting
swastikas on buildings. But they
definitely have an indirect
influence on that kind of thing."
Lobenthal called education
and legislation primary tools in
the battle against anti-
Semitism. He praised a bill cur-
rently before the State. Senate
that would permit stiffer penal-
ties for ethnically motivated
vandalism. The bill, sponsored
by Michigan legislator David
Honigman (R-W. Bloomfield),
has already been passed by the
State House of Representatives.
The national findings, made
public this. week by Nathan
Perlmutter, ADL's national di-
rector, were divided into two
basic categories: vandalism,
ranging from swastika daubings
to bombings; and personal as-
saults, threats and harassments.
They revealed 638 reported in-
cidents of vandalism against
Jewish institutions and private
Jewish homes in 34 states and
the District of Columbia, an 11
percent decrease from the 1984
total of 715. The 638 incidents
included six arsons, as against
nine in 1984; five attempted ar-
sons, as against eight the prev-
ious year; three bombings, the
same as in 1984; and three at-
tempted bombings, as against
one in 1984.
The report points out that al-
though there were fewer inci-
dents of vandalism, several were
particularly disturbing and re-
ceived nationwide attention.
The survey also revealed 306
anti-Semitic assaults (such as
beatings), threats and harass-
ments (such as abusive mailings
and telephone calls) against
Jews and Jewish property, a .17
percent decrease from 369 in
1984.The audit was prepared by
the research department of
ADL's Civil Rights Division
from data gathered through the

Richard Lobenthai: Looking for
answers.

monitoring activities of the
agency's 30 regional offices.
Perlmutter pointed out that
the new findings reflect a gen-
eral five-year downward trend,
interrupted by a small increase
in 1984. He called the current
statistics "encouraging" and said
they were most likely the result
of Stricter legislation, vigorous
law enforcement and increased
educational programs. He added,
however, that while the audit is
"a useful yardstick for measur-
ing one aspect of anti-Jewish
hostility in the United States,
there are other manifestations
of anti-Semitism."
According to the audit, New
York and California were again
the states with the most van-
dalism incidents: New York had
199 as orsed to 237 in 1984;
Californi had 85 as opposed to
99 the p evious year.
New Jersey succeeded Mary-
land as the third highest on the
list and was one of the few
states with an increase, 74 as
against 56.
The other leading states were
Florida with 47, down four;
Maryland, 38, down 31;
Pennsylvania, 31, up three; Il-
linois 23, up four; Massachu-
setts, 22, up two; Virginia 14,
up five; Connecticut, 12, up se-
ven; and Minnesota, 11, doWtn
four. The remaining 22 states
and the District of Columbia
each reported fewer than nine
incidents. -
Across the country, 78 persons
were arrested in connection with
48 incidents in 1985. In 1984,
there were 84 arrests in connec-
tion with 51 incidents.

.

Toronto Aid
Group Formed

Toronto (JTA) — Three or-
ganizations providing loans to
needy JeWs for different ,pur-
poses have recently amalga-
mated into one agency, the To-
ronto Jewish Assistance Ser-
vices (TJAS).
The three , agencies which
joined together are the Loan
Cassa, the Hebrew Reestablish -
ment Services, and Scholarships
in Aid.

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