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December 20, 1985 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-12-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

12

Friday, December 20, 1985 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

LOCAL NEWS

WATER HERZ INTERIORS

N
1
P
I
LICIU
SALE

Messiah Theories Abound,
Rabbi Tells Audience

BY SHARON PLOTNICK
Special to The Jewish News

We are moving to a new location.

Our entire inventory must be sold by
January 4th.

Everything

30% to 70% off

This is a once-in-a-lifetime
special sale of all Designer
Merchandise including:

Unique, one-of-a-kind decorative
accessory pieces, decorative lamps,
unusual tables, many types of
beautiful chairs, wall units
and much more.

CASH • MASTERCARD • VISA ACCEPTED • ALL SALES FINAL
NO LAYAWAYS • SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE

HOURS OF THIS SPECIAL SALE:
Monday through Saturday, 9 to 5
Sunday, December 29, 12 to 5

WALTER HERZ INTERIORS

29425 Northwestern Hwy., N. of 12 Mile Rd.
Southfield
353-4150

Rabbi Harlow with the new prayer book he edited.

Although Jews consider the
Messiah a human agent rather
than a divine one, they are still
"prisoners of hope" when it
comes to theories about the
Messiah's eventual appearance,
according to Rabbi Jules Har-
low.
Harlow, whose High Holiday
prayer book has been a staple at
Conservative synagogues since
1972, spoke about the Messiah
earlier this month at Adat
Shalom Synagogue in Far-
mington Hills.
One theory, the rabbi said,
claims that the Messiah will
come only when he is no longer
necessary, when man is right-
eous enough to deserve him.
Another theory says that the
Messiah will come out of total
goodness or out of total chaos
and that God in his own good
time will send the Messiah. If
this is so, then why does human
behavior matter? The answer,
according to Rabbi Harlow, is
that good behavior will hasten
the event.
The rabbi feels there is a uni-
versalistic sense of the messiah.
When the Messianic day does
come, there will be a change in
the heart of man and an end to
hatred.
Those attending the program
had their own views on waiting
for the Messiah. "Everyone can
only act oti their own behalf,"
Willard ROen said. "In my own
lifetime I never expect to see the
Messiah the way the world is
today."
Another member of the audi-
ence, a Holocaust survivor, said
"The concept of the Messiah is

uplifting and it instills meaning
to life. I come to my Jewishness
by choice. Whatever I can do to
reinforce Jewishness for myself
and my children is very impor-
tant to me."
Rabbi Harlow is director of
publications for the Rabbinical
Assembly and served as editor
of the new Siddur Sim Shalom,
the new Conservative prayer
book.
The new Siddur incorporates
the Holocaust and the modern
state of Israel into the prayers
and deletes ancient phraseology
in favor of more up-to-date lan-
guage.
Rabbi Harlow, a native of
Sioux City, Iowa, is a graduate
of Morningside College in Sioux
City. He was ordained at the
Jewish Theological Seminary.

Kach Campaign

New York — The national
coordinator of Rabbi Meir
Kahane's Kach 'party claims
that Kach representatives will
start a national U.S. campaign
to force local rabbis to "vote" on
whether they favor Israel as a
Western democracy or as a
Jewish state.
Kenneth Sidman told a Bos-
ton radio interviewer that Kach
representatives will stand in
front of synagogues on Sunday
mornings and distribute letters
to congregants and parents of
Sunday school children, telling
them -how their rabbi voted.

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