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December 06, 1985 - Image 74

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

74

Friday, December 6, 1985

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

M oriah fine arts

UP & OUT

A New Program For
SENIORS
Chanukah

in Sunset Strip

29512 Northwestern
Southfield, 353 3888

Wednesday, Dec. 18th
12:00 Noon
Knob-in-Woods Clubhouse

-

Proudly Presents:

PEGGY MEAD KORONCEY

"IN SONG"
Cantor Samuel Greenbaum

award winning Michigan watercolorist

WHEN: Every Wednesday from 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
WHAT: Demonstrating Watercolor Painting
WIN: Amateur Artist of Month Award by

A Time Of Testing
For Egypt's Mubarak

BY HELEN DAVIS
Special To The Jewish News

Latkas — Gifts
$3,00 — R.S.V.P.
258-6000 for

trying your own talents

BACKGROUND

Reservation/Transportation

SERVED: Fresh Coffee & Baked Goods

Sponsored by
National Council of Jewish Women
Greater Detroit Section

Call The Jewish News
Today

354-6060

Wide World photo

ekfndle
the

Hosni Mubarak: In trouble at home and abroad.

Flavor
of the
Holidays

-4

Offer your family and friends an appetizing treat
of fresh-roasted Germack pistachios. Take advantage
of the generous terms of our Holiday Coupon.

0 $500

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is redeemable only at
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at 5151 Bellevue, Detroit.

Also Available
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29525 Northwestern Highway
Southfield

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VALID UNTIL 12/31/85

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Monday through Friday: 8:30 A.M.-5:00 P.M.
Saturday: 9:00 A.M.-2:00 P.M.
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2 miles East of Eastern Mkt. off Gratiot

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Despite his icy relations with
Israel since coming to power in
1981, Egyptian President Hosni
Mubarak is unlikely to be re-
warded with a return to the
heart of the Arab world when
the Arab League meets in
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia for its
first full summit since 1982.
The Egyptian leader will not,
of course, be present; Egypt has
been excluded from the Arab
League since the late President
Anwar Sadat formally made
peace with Israel in 1979.
Nevertheless, he must have
been entertaining high hopes
that the Riyadh summit would
mark the beginning of his coun-
try's "rehabilitation" in the
Arab world.
But fresh from the humilia-
tion of the Achille Lauro affair
— with charges ringing around
the Arab world that he con-
spired with Washington, D.C. in
the capture of the hijackers —
Mubarak's expectations of re-
storing relations with other
Arab states and returning Egypt
to its natural leadership role is
withering with each passing
day.
Moreover, the U.S. F-14 jet
fighters which intercepted the
Egypt Air Boeing-737 not only
brought the hijackers down to
earth to face their accusers, they
also brought Mubarak face to
face with his most serious
domestic political crisis since he
assumed power.
The extent of the damage was
quickly evident: the day after
the interception, thousands of
angry university students took
to the streets of Cairo. They
went through the ritualistic
burning of the flags of the
United States and Israel, and
were only stopped from storming

Helen Davis is a writer who lives' in
Israel.

the Israeli Embassy by Egyptian
security guards firing tear gas
grenades.
But there was another target
for their fury: above the raucous
din of the angry young Cairenes
rose a chant that was as unex-
pected as it was chilling —
"Mubarak, coward, U.S. agent."
True or not, the very fact that
such suspicions are entertained
is indicative of the level of pub-
lic regard for a leader who has
clearly failed to rally the sup-
port of his people, let alone scale
the mythical heights of his two
predecessors.
Gamal Abdel Nasser was
idolized by his people despite
Egypt's comprehensive defeat in
the Six-Day War, and Anwar
Sadat's charisma and calm car-
ried his country along the dif-
ficult road to peace with Israel.
But Mubarak has demonstrably
failed to impress his own style
on his country or command the
loyalty and devotion of his
people.
And while Sadat maneuvered
himself adroitly out of the huge
shadow cast by the legendary
Nasser, Mubarak remains trap-
ped in the mold of the essential
"apparatchik" — an extension of
the stifling bureaucracy that
characterizes his administration.
When Sadat was struck .down
by Islamic fundamentalist as-
sassins in October 1981, Hosni
Mubarak inherited a country
which, while still mired in pov-
erty, was at peace with Israel,
its most powerful neighbor, and
which enjoyed an income of
some $3 billion per year in aid
from the United States, a re-
ward for the peace treaty with
Israel.
But he also inherited the
penalties which accompanied
the treaty: deep hostility from a
sizeable minority of Egyptians
and diplomatic isolation from

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