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December 06, 1985 - Image 34

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

34

Friday, December 6, 1985

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

THE EYE CENTER OF SOUTHFIELD

NEWS

(formerly the practice of Harold Plisliow, M.D. )
is pleased to announce its

5TH ANNIVERSARY

Chaff Spy

• Cataract and Glaucoma Screening
• Outpatient Cataract and Lens Implant
Surgery
• Lazer Surgery
• Diagnostic Vision Examination
and Consultation

Continued from preceding page

FULL MEDICARE PARTICIPATION

EDWARD A. HOLLENBERG, M.D. P.C.

15901 W. Nine Mile Road
Suite 202
Southfield, MI 48075

Office Hours
By Appointment

Phone 569-0155

The JEWISH NEWS covers the events from the
Mideast to the Midwest. Now, with our new
T-shirt, we even cover our readers!

For the regular subscription price of only $21.00,
you get both the maroon and ton T-shirt and 52
weeks of this much acclaimed Jewish publica-
tion. This offer is for NEW subscriptions only. Cur-
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$3.75. Allow four weeks delivery.

Please clip coupon and mail to:
JEWISH NEWS T-SHIRT
20300 CIVIC CENTER DR., SUITE 240
SOUTHFIELD, MICHIGAN 48076-4138

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Out of State - $23 — Foreign - $35
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99 ,

0- 0 •.. e.

been married for only five
months.
U.S. officials were distressed
by reports from Israel that the
Israeli intelligence operative
who supposedly ran the secre-
tive unit involved in the affair
would probably not be pun-
ished. But they recognized
that punishing this official
could have very serious domes-
tic political ramifications
within Israel, including a possi-
ble collapse of the National
Unity Government, given his
ties to the Likud and the pro-
fessional intelligence commun-
ity.
The Americans were, there-
fore, also sympathetic to the
Israeli predicament. "I guess
he would not agree to go down
alone," one American spec-
ialist said. "He would try to
take some others with him."
But the internal fighting
within Israel looked this week
like it was just beginning.
Peres's efforts to calm tensions
with Washington were suc-
ceeding, but his damage con-
trol efforts in Israel, especial-
ly in the press, were not.
An American official said
the U.S. was uncertain about
the exact degree of political
authority the Pollard opera-
tion may have had in Israel.
"We don't know," he said.
Appearing on ABC-TV,
former Central Intelligence
Agency Director Richard
Helms, now retired, said he
had been surprised that it took
Israel so long to issue the
apology. But he, too, welcomed
the statement.
In response to questioning,
Helms acknowledged that the
U.S. also uses "all kinds of
human agents" to spy on other
countries, including friendly
ones. Asked flatly whether the
U.S. wages espionage activ-
ities against friendly NATO
allies, Helms replied: "I hope
so."
"Friendly countries spy on
friendly countries," he said.
"Countries know that they are
spying on each other."
But FBI Director William
Webster said the U.S. and
Israel, over the years, had
developed "regular channels"
for sharing sensitive intel-
ligence information. Paying an
American citizen for additional
intelligence "is not one of
them," he added.
Another former CIA Direc-
tor, William Colby, declined to
say whether the U.S. spies on
friendly governments. "I don't
think I ought to say," he said.
"We collect information all
sorts of ways."
But in response to a ques-
tion, he said the U.S. — if the
situation - were reversed —
would carefully weigh the
possible impact of being
caught if an Israeli intelligence
analyst volunteered to sell
classified information to the
United States. "We might
decide it may not be worth the
price," he said.
. , Both Colby and Leahy said

it was unclear whether there
were "other Pollards" operat-
ing in Washington. "We don't
know," Colby said.
Labor MK Simcha Dinitz, a
former Ambassador to the
United States, expressed
regret that the Pollard matter
had been so blown up over the
past week. He said that he
would have expected such a
delicate issue to be resolved
more discreetly, "away from
the public eye," given the close
relationship between the two
countries.
He nevertheless conceded
that Israel had made "a ter-
rible mistake." It was an act of
"very serious negligence" on
the part of Israel. He insisted
that the highest political
leaders in the country were
unaware of the Pollard opera-
tion. It was, he added, "con-
trary to our policy."
The evidence released so far
by U.S. governmental investi-
gators, as presented in pre-
liminary court hearings and in
the news media, points direct-
ly to officials at the Israeli Em-

"Countries know
that they are spying
on each other."

bassy in Washington as hav-
ing accepted hundreds of
stolen documents, stamped
"top secret", from Pollard.
On ABC's "Nightline", an-
chorman Ted Koppel inter-
viewed Admiral Bobby Inman
— someone uniquely qualified
to discuss the Pollard case. In-
man is himself a former direc-
tor of U.S. naval intelligence as
well as the super-secret Na-
tional Security Agency, which
is charged with electronic in-
tercepting of communications
and high-flying reconnaissance
photography. Inman was the
Deputy Director of the Central
Intelligence Agency during the
first two years of the Reagan
Administration.
Asked why Israel would risk
upsetting its generally co-
operative relationship with the
United States by recruiting an
American spy who also hap-
pened to be Jewish, Inman
replied that the Israeli auth-
orities probably concluded
that "the desire to get their
hands on specific kinds of in-
formation" might have made
the operAtion worth the risk.
He conceded that the U.S.
already provides Israel with
extensive information, es-
pecially involving the offensive
military threats facing Israel.
But Washington often holds
back in providing informaticin
- to Israel, which might be
useful in enabling Israel to
undertake "pre-emptive at-
tacks," he added. Pollard
might have made such infor-
mation available to Israel, he
said, citing as an example in-
formation which could have

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