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November 29, 1985 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-11-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS Friday, November 29, 1985

00000000000000000

hen It Comes To Pain,
ause Supersedes Effect

Y RABBI MORTON F. YOLKUT
ecial to The Jewish News

The sages of the Midrash take a
mg hard look at the life and
'lies of the patriarch Jacob and
onclude that "there is no rest for
ie righteous in this world." It is a
ad statement and it is also a tor-
t statement. Indeed, the entire
Se of Jacob, from before his birth
rktil after his death, is one con-
inuous documentation of this
ath.
Jacob's life was one constant
truggle, one continual crisis.
even before he was born, he had to
rrestle his twin brother in his
aother's womb. As a child, he had
fight his brother for the birth-
ight and the blessing. He ran
ay from Esau's anger and ran
nto Laban, who in his own cun-
dng way was even a greater chal-
?-nge. He worked for Laban for 20
ears, and had to fight and con-

Vayishlach: Genesis
72: 4-36:43. Obadiah
1:1-21.

pire to get his proper wages. He
carried wives who quarreled over
irn. He raised sons who did not
lways obey him.
In this week's sidrah, Jacob
repares for the confrontation
'th Esau, which he expected to
e a bloody one. Just prior to this
eunion he wrestled with a mys-
ious stranger throughout the
ght and was wounded. Then he
ad the pain of seeing his only
laughter molested.
Later in the book of Genesis,
,hings go from bad to worse. Jacob
returns to his father's home, hop-
ng to find that illusive peace and
-st and he is immediately con-
ronted with the tragedy of Joseph
d his brothers. His favorite son
as taken from him and believed
ead. And then when he was in-
ormed that Joseph was alive, he
ad to again leave his home be-
use of a famine and spend the
3t years of his life in Egypt. And
even at the very end, this aged
an who sought peace all of his
days and never found it, had to
implore his children to take his
remains back, to the Promised
Land.
We all can appreciate this truth
';:-: om our own lives as well. The
is so made that each person
,
1_ world
in it has his full measure of sorrow
and pain. No one has permanent
peace of mind. What then is the
difference between the good per-
son and the bad? The difference is
in what they suffer for, in what it
/ib that takes away their peace of
mind.
The measure of a human being
is what bothers him, what dis-
turbs him. He who would live a
life without pain has come to the
wrong world. But we can choose,
\ perhaps not completely but cer-
' tainly in part, the kind of pain we
\want to endure.
' A couple, for example, can opt
between the pain of having and
raising children or the pain of not
shaving and not raising them.
What parent has peace of mind?

Each age brings with it new prob-
lems and new crises. The Yiddish
proverb puts it very well: "Kleyne
kinder, kleyne tzores; groyse kin-
der, groyse tzores (Young chil-
dren, small problems; older chil-
dren, bigger problems)." There is
aggravation, tension and pain
most of the time, but it is creative,
and fulfilling pain and it is well
worth it!
We choose every day of our lives
between reaching out to others
with all the risks and pains that
involves, or keeping to ourselves,
with all the certain pain that
entails. A petty person feels pain
each time his toes are stepped on
or his honor is abused. A great
person feels pain when another
human being suffers, who cares
and is concerned for those beyond
himself.
The measure of a person is not
whether he has pain and tzores —
this all people do — but what is it
that gives him the pain. Blessed is
the one who suffers for worth-
while things, who experiences the
pain of achievement, the struggle
of building, the frustrations of
creating and the joy of accom-
plishment. Peace of mind is an
unrealistic and illusory goal, but
to serve and struggle and fight in
an important cause is a goal
worthy of us all.

Kahane Support
Surprises Two

New York (JTA) — Two Israelis
— one Arab, the other Jewish —
who have completed a two-week
speaking tour in the U.S., said
here that they were surprised by
the support within the American
Jewish community for the views
of Rabbi Meir Kahane, the leader
of the ultra-nationalist Kach
Party, who advocates the ousting
of all Arabs from Israel.
Rafik Halabi, an Israeli jour-
nalist who is a member of the
Druze sect, and Rabbi Moshe
Habertal, a leader of Netivot
Shalom, an Israeli religious peace
group, came to the U.S. as Leader-
ship Fellows under awards from
the New Israel Fund, a group
which works for civil rights and
Jewish-Arab cooperation in Is-
rael. They spoke Nov. 20 at a press
conference at the American
Jewish Committee.
"I have confused impressions
from the meetings with American
Jews," Halabi said. "We met
many Jews who support Kahane,
but at the same time we met many
Jews who are for pluralism and
democracy in Israel."
"I found that the American
Jewish community is divided
along the same line as the Israeli
society," Habertal said.
He said that he is bothered by
the use of "religious propoganda"
by Kahane and his supporters to
gain inroads among American
Jews. "Fighting Kahanism is
fighting for the soul of Judaism,"
he asserted.

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A CovitinAlvig Core Colter

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