100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

November 22, 1985 - Image 82

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

82

Friday, November 22, 1985 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Great Holiday Gifts
Clothes
for that
Always
20%
Every Day
OFF
Casual Look...

Call The Jewish News

354-6060

Mack Pitt

anJ his

Orchestra

i'57177111

i• 4 r AMA ir 1 471
1//1/10WAIMIMINI1111111111

plus

Disco

Hunters Square

Orchard Lake Rd. at 14 Mile

358-3642

855-4460

Advertising in The Jewish News Gets Results
Place Your Ad Today. Call 354 - 6060

e Us" Ma"

•designer handbags
• hand knits
•unique jewelry
•belts, hats, hosiery

("N

el/C 'CC

THE ULT ✓ ATE IN V./OMENS ACCFSSi )R , FS

851-8878
WEST BLOOMFIELD

Seventh Heaven's

BUILD A BEAUTIFUL BEDROOM SALE

FAMOUS NAME & DESIGNER SHEETS

Reg.

NOW
87.99-8.99

TWINS

$22-825

FULLS

$25-829

89.99-12.99

QUEENS

835-842

$12.99-18.99

KINGS

845-850

$15.99-2L99

STD. CASES

820-825

89.99-10.99

KING CASES

822-826

88.99-11.99

50% OFF

FAMOUS NAME COMFORTERS
Fieldcrest
Martex
Cannon
1st Qual. & Irreg.
Springmajd

20-70% OFF '

FIELDCREST "POPULARITY" TOWELS
Reg.
NOW
BATH TOWEL
14.00
86.59
HAND TOWEL
9.75
- $4.79
3.75
WASH CLOTH
82.39
BATH SHEET
26.00
812.99

50% OFF

50% OFF

FIELDCREST "ROYAL VELVET" TOWELS
on White Sale
All 34 Colors
with coordinating rugs

WE DISCOUNT
HORIZONTAL & VERTICAL BLINDS

Tel Aviv U., U.S. Sends
Hornets Into. Space

When 180 Oriental hornets
are rocketed into Earth's orbit
during the summer of 1986, Tel
Aviv University Prof. Jacob
Ishay is convinced, there is no
chance that they will escape in-
side the space shuttle.
They will not sting the as-
tronauts with their poisonous
venom. The hornets, says Ishay,
will be contained securely inside
a metal locker.
The hornets will be sent into
space for a study of how they
adapt to near-weightless condi-
tions — an environment in
which gravity is a thousandth or
less of that on Earth. By study-
ing the insects' behavior Ishay
hopes to learn how humans can
cope better with space sickness,
an unusual malady that has
caused more than one - third of
the astronauts to suffer from
headaches, nausea and_weak-
ness.
professor _ of
a
Ishay,
entomology at Tel Aviv Univer-
sity, met with University of
Pennsylvania biologists recently
to discuss his research.
During an interview, he said
Oriental hornets were being
used because of their unusual
ability — not found in humans
or other mammals — to detect
tiny amounts of gravitation and
react to them.
Among the questions Ishay
hopes to answer as a result of
his hornet mission are:
• Will the hornets work to-
gether, as they do on Earth, or
will they become disoriented
and abandon their cooperative
instincts?
• W ill the hornet's unhatched
young, or pupae, still emit a

"hunger signal" — a rhythmic
beat emerging from the comb
when they are hungry — in
space?
Ishay, 54, said the hornets
were expected to be sent up
sometime between July and Oc-
tober 1986. His shuttle project
will mark the first time that the
Israel Space Agency and the
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration (NASA) have
collaborated on a space mission.
Ishay said the hornets would
be enclosed in a box about the
size of a large typewriter case
that will be stationed on the
middeck, near the front of the
space shuttle.
Ten hornets would be enclosed
in each of 18 compartments in-
side the metal locker. The tem-
perature will be kept at about
84 degrees — a condition the
hornets are used to in their
natural habitat of the Middle
East, East Africa and India.
Ishay said he was not worried
that the hornets would die in
space, because of their unusual
abilities to adapt. In laboratory
experiments, they have survived
up to 500 times the gravity
found on Earth, he said.
Contrary to the case on some
past shuttle flights, NASA offi-
cials are not requiring the Tel
Aviv University professor to
remove the hornets' stingers —
even though the venom of 40 to
50 Oriental hornets is potent
enough to kill a person.
"Oriental hornets are one of
the most dangerous types of
hornets," Ishay said. "But don't
worry. There is no chance that
they will be able to escape."

Project Renewal Draws
Mixed Reviews In Report

BY CARL ALPERT
Special to The Jewish News

FLANNEL SHEET SPECIAL
Selected Irregulars
by Martex

FIELDCREST BLANKETS
Selected
Group

NEWS

GET REIMS

A SUPER SELECTION OF
FAMOUS NAME BLANKETS

MAGNIFICENT SHAG RUGS by FIELDCREST
Small Oval
Large Oval
Contour & Lid
9 Colors

50% OFF

THIS SUNDAY ONLY
PREVIOUS PURCHASES EXCLUDED
ALL SALES FINAL

§eventh Heaven

855-3777

Hunters Square

Orchard Lake & 14 Mile
Farmington Hills

VISA'

Haifa — Since it was inaugu-
rated in 1977, the Jewish Agen-
cy's Project Renewal has oper-
ated in 84 Israeli neighborhoods
in need of rehabilitation. Of the
close to $500 million expended
for this purpose, some 60 per-
cent came from the government,
and 40 percent from com-
munities abroad. The undertak-
ing has been given great public-
ity. But how successful has it
really been?
One study, limited only to the
administrative structure and
procedural operations of the
project and carried out by an
internal controller's committee
of the Jewish Agency itself, was
said to expose glaring deficien-
cies. However, that report was
locked up in a cabinet and not
published.
So it was good news when the
Samuel Neaman Institute for
Advanced Studies in Science
and Technology, located at the
Technion, was commissioned to
undertake an objective survey.
A staff of eight professionals has

spent more than two years on
the undertaking.
The Neaman Institute scien-
tists, headed by research coor-
dinator Prof. M. Hill, decided to
concentrate on four areas: Who
benefitted from all the money
spent? To what extent was there
participation by the residents of
the areas involved? Did the
project indeed make a contribu-
tion, or did it simply relieve the
government of tasks it should
have undertaken anyhow
(known as budget displace-
ment)? What changes have
taken place in the neighbor-
hoods?
Ten representative com-
munities were selected for
study. Ramle, sponsored by De-
troit, was not one of these, but
the overall findings are similar.
At the outset it -was noted
that the project officials had a
conception of priorities different
from those of the local residents.
The professionals rated as first
in importance the raising of the
residents' self-image and out-

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan