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November 22, 1985 - Image 80

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

80

Friday, November 22, 1985 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

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NEWS

Coming Of Age

Continued from preceding page

Rabbi Yolkut being this year's
Detroit rabbinic delegate.
Berman was re-elected one of
11 CJF vice presidents. Frankel
and Schlussel were elected to
the CJF board, and Martin Cit-
rin and Fisher serve as life
members of that body. Giles and
Naftaly also serve on the board
because of their committee
chairmanships.

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U.S. Jewry
And Politics

Thursday's morning sessions
were devoted to American Jews
and politics, with a major ple-
nary and ten concurrent ses-
sions. Theodore Mann, president
of the American Jewish Con-
- gress, admonished his audience
that "Jews who vote Republican
are closer to Jewish Democrats
than they are to other Republi-
cans." He said that American
Jews must vote for a "Jewish
program," and not just Demo-
cratic or Republican programs.
"Jews believe that government
must use the revenues it collects
to help those who need help," he
said.
Mann said Jews express
themselves politically through
friends, Jewish organizations
and political action committees.
He suggested that joining
Jewish organizations
strengthens all Jews' political
power. "But we must be careful
when we exercise our power as
single-issue constituents," he
admonished. "We should not
support ome Senator who op-
poses us on every other issue,
but backs us on Israel."
Peggy Tishman, president-
elect of New York's Federation
of Jewish Philanthropies, told a
later session that 50 percent of
all Jews under the age of 35 are
not registered to vote.
Hyman Bookbinder of the
American Jewish Committee
told the same session that
American Jewish political power
has grown immensely in the last
40 years, and "if we had had
that power at the time of tte
Holocaust, we could have saved
more of the Six Million." Book-
binder, like Mann, argued for a
network of Jewish groups and
agencies to make the pro-Israel
effort effective.. While welcoming
the increasing strength of the
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee on Capitol Hill,
Jewish political action commit-
tees and the National Jewish
Coalition, he said we can't just
credit one group.
"Israel gets support from the
United States," he said, "not be-
cause 21/2 percent of the Ameri-
can public are Jews, but because
60 to 70 percent of Americans
support Israel. We have to con-
tinue working for that broad
base."
Marshall Breger, former Re-
agan Administration liaison to
the Jewish community who was
recently named chairman of the
U.S. Administrative Conference,
argued against "guilt-free" poli-
tics. Breger said Jews "can't di-
minish our leaverage by seeking

guilt-free, clean politics. Both
single-issue and multi-issue
people are both right and wrong.
"Split your money. Leaverage
your clout," he said. "Give
through several • different
groups. Don't spend two weeks
trying to explain all the
nuances. Don't use the same de-
cibel level for every issue." He
said this resulted in politicians
receiving false signals from the
Jewish community and misin-
terpretation of Jewish voters'
priorities.
Breger argued that Jewish
voters must work with other
groups, including Southwest oil
invests and evangelical Chris-
tians. "This doesn't mean you're
giving up in areas of disagree-
ment. It means getting together
in areas where you agree."
Bookbinder and Breger had a
friendly exchange over use of
the term guilt-free and how to
build coalitions. Breger argued
that "you can't cut and run
when someone comes to you
with their agenda. You don't
have to sell the house, but you
do have to be flexible." He said
holding sustained dialogues
with evangelicals and conserva-
tives might lead to some shift-
ing of attitudes. "You won't con-
vert them," he argued, "but you
may be able to open some eyes."
Other sessions at the same
time covered Canadian politics,
federation roles in developing
Public policy, church-state is-
sues, coalition building, anti-
Zionism and anti-Semitism,
black-Jewish relations, college
activism, demographic changes
affecting Jewish political power
and decentralization.

,

Temple Stirs
Emotions

BY CHANI LEVENE

With the crystals of the 31/2
ton chandelier catching the
light; the ark incorporating the
symbols of the altar and the
cherubs; the 1700 red plush and
oak seats; the song of the choir
resonanting from the specially-
designed sunken well; and the
company of fellow Worshippers
from all over the world praying
- attending services at the Great
Synagogue of Jerusalem is quite
an experience, and a credit to
those who conceived the idea of
building such an edifice.
The idea for one large central
synagogue in new Jerusalem
was born when Jews began to
move beyond the old city walls
in the middle of the 19th cen-
tury. New neighborhoods, each
with one or more small
synagogues, grew up. Herbert
Samuel, the first British High
Commissioner (1920-25) felt
that such a synagogue should be
the first project undertaken by
the public to unite Jerusalem.
Fifty years before the Jerusalem
Great Synagogue was dedicated
to the then Chief Rabbis of
Palestine, Rabbis A.I. Kook and
J. Meir signed a pamphlet ask-

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