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November 22, 1985 - Image 24

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

24

Friday, November 22, 1985 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

LEVIN BEAUTY

M. WIGLER JEWELRY

Fragrances
Beauty Supplies
Cosmetics

"De Beer Competition Winner"

SEE OUR FABULOUS LINE
OF JEWELRY

Bring this ad and take

Continued from Page 1

Open 7 Days

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.

Iiii ii... - iiiiiiii

•• 1.1 I. I. Is
NARROWED:

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lapels
$39. 11
Pant Legs
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Shirt Collars
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Ties
5.;
II
BRAND NAME
g
SUITS

1

4

Saturday, Nov. 30th

20% OFF

WITH THIS AD
We have mastered the art of
intricate fitting and tailoring.

18K Creative Affordable Jewelry and Diamonds

:FRE

MICHAEL S. WIGLER

MONOGRAMMING

WITH PURCHASE OF SHIRTS

I

SE OUR
1
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iptt

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a rBETTFit CLOTHES & CUSTOM TAILORS
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Phone: (313) 651-8880

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that last month when they were
arrested, but delegates to the
Council of Jewish Federations
General Assembly last week had
to be quietly warned of the
ground rules.
Avital Shcharansky, wife of
Soviet Prisoner of Conscience
Anatoly Shcharansky, on
Thursday invited the 3,300,
delegates to the CJF to join her
in silent protest Friday morn-
ing. Some 600 broke away from
the CJF sessions during the two
days to honor her invitation,
using CJF shuttle busses or
walking from their hotels to the
Embassy on 16th Street, just a
few blocks from the White
House.
In a quiet voice that could
barely be heard above the noise
of the passing traffic, Avital told
of her hopes that "Reagan will
bring our case in the strongest
terms" to Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev at the summit meet-
ings in Geneva this week. "We
have," she said, "400,000 hos-
tages in Russia."
She said Anatoly has spent
the last two months in solitary
confinemnt, given only bread
and water and that his mother
has received five letters from
him this year instead of the 20
permitted by Soviet law. She
added, "Anatoly is dying day by
day in the wish to go to Israel
... We should all make aliyah
... Next year in Jerusalem."
In her composed, soft voice,
she urged the gathering to join
Sunday's demonstration in
Lafayete Park, across from the
White House. Avital left Wash-
ington on Friday to join human
rights demonstrators in Geneva.

1986 Campaign

Continued from Page 1

tures.
A graduate of Trinity College
in Hartford, Conn., Will re-
ceived a degree from Oxford
University and a Ph.D. from
Princeton. He has taught politi-
cal philosophy at Michigan
State University and the Uni-
versity of Toronto.
The Dec. 17 event will signal
the start of an intensive period
of campaigning with meetings
scheduled for all Campaign di-
visions by the end of the year.

Final Telethon

, With less than two months to
go before the end of the year,
volunteers will call on all unse-
cured pledges that remain from
the 1985 Allied Jewish Cam-
paign, during a final telethon on
Monday.
This will enable the Cam-
paign to reach its budgeted goal
of $22.2 million and assure that
humanitarian services at home,
in Israel and overseas, can be
met.
Contributors who make and
pay their 1985 pledge now can
still take advantage of 1985 tax
benefits for charitable contribu-
tions.

Abe Stolar

The visitors dispersed as a
shuttle bus dropped off another
50 CJF delegates. For brief sec-
onds the sidewalk and plaza
area cleared as the two busloads
exchanged places. A few of the
delegates drifted across the
street to stand by the high iron
fence guarding the Soviet Em-
bassy and to talk to District of
Columbia police watching the
proceedings. Two children dres-
sed in native Russian costumes
and carrying flowers, accom-
panied by their parents, walked
past the delegates, through the
Embassy gate and into the
building. "If it were only that
easy for Soviet Jews to come the
other way," one delegate ob-
served.
Another was intrigued by a
street sign placed next to the
Embassy grounds, renaming the
area "Sakharov Square" in
honor of dissident scientist An-
drei Sakharov. It appears to be
the District of Columbia's own
quiet protest.
Others talked of the daily
vigil conducted at the Embassy
by the Washington Jewish
community since the late 1970s.
Some mentioned the cooperation
of the labor union headquarters
across the street, permitting the
demonstrators to use their plaza
for the last six years, only rop-
ing off a narrow walkway for
viAlitors to the building. Tenants
of neighboring buildings, the
demonstrators were told, were
considering a law suit against
the Soviets because of the com-
munications equipment atop the
Embassy. They fear the health
hazards of microwave transmis-
sions similar to those bombard-
ing the U.S. Embassy in Mos-
cow.
But for this day, the main
topic of concern is Anatoly
Shcharansky, deteriorating in a
Russian prison for the crime of
trying to legally emigrate from
a biased land.
A Soviet spokesman in
Geneva tried to counter the
pre-summit human rights pres-
sure. Spokesman Leonid
Zamyatin told Western reporters
last Friday, "In the United
States there are major pogroms
against the Jews, and there are
legal organizations against
Jews." He said 315 synagogues
had been desecrated in Brook-

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