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November 15, 1985 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Note-Able
Families

See Page 15

THE

J

WISH NEWS

SERVING DETROIT'S METROPOLITAN JEWISH COMMUNITY

THIS ISSUE 50c

CLOSE-UP

WHO CARES
ABOUT
HEBREW SCHOOLS?

NOVEMBER 15, 1985

U.S. Still Hopes
For Year-End Talks

Middle East peace tied to
Gorbachev, moderate
Palestinians.

BY WOLF BLITZER
Special to The Jewish News

Washington — The Reagan Ad-
ministration is still committed to
geting direct Arab-Israeli peace
negotiations started before the end
of this year. This was strongly reaf-
firmed by authoritative U.S. officials
in recent days.
The upcoming summit in
Geneva between Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev and President
Ronald Reagan is seen by these offi-
cials as possibly holding the key to
meeting that target date.
There are no guarantees, but

the Americans made clear that they
remain very optimistic. In part, they
base their hope on their conviction
that Prime Minister Shimon Peres of
Israel, King Hussein of Jordan and
President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt
are personally very committed to the
peace process. This combination,
they said, should eventually result
in real peace talks.
They are reluctant to provide

ANALYSIS

many details of what they privately
concede have been some dramatic
behind-the-scenes developments.
Clearly, progress — slow but steady
— is being made. It is now taken for
granted in Washington, for example,

Continued on Page 32

The Time Factor
Is Hurting Israel

Expert asks JCCouncil:
How do you live where
you're not wanted?

BY HEIDI PRESS
Local News Editor

Kids are bored, parents are
busy, teachers are frustrated.
And at stake: the Jewish future

See Page 26

"Time is working against us;
there are not enough Jews in Israel.
These are the realities."
Yosef Olmert, director of the
Syria/Lebanon desk at the Moshe
Dayan Center for Middle Eastern
and African Studies, Tel Aviv Uni-
versity, made this assessment last
week as he addressed more than 200
persons attending the Jewish Com-
munity Council delegate assembly at
the main United Hebrew Schools
building.
Olmert, currently on sabbatical
in Toronto, painted a picture of Is-
rael's current political status on sev-
eral fronts: the Israel-Lebanon bor-
der, Syrian intervention in the Mid-
dle East crisis, Israel-Egypt rela-
tions, arms sales to Jordan, the
Judea-Samaria (West Bank) issue
and the Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization and terrorism.
The Tel Aviv U. professor said
in regard to the Israel-Lebanon bor-
der that "Today the situation on our

border with Lebanon is much better
than we would've expected three
months ago," attributing the peace-
ful atmosphere to Israel's decision to
leave the area and non-intervention
by the Syrian government.
However, he said, the Syrians
are a major cause for tension in the
area. We should address the real
problem (in the Mideast crisis):
Syria." He added that the Syrian
government knows the whereabouts
of the six missing Americans held in
Lebanon and that it is the Syrians

Continued on Page 36

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