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November 08, 1985 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

8

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, November 8, 1985

compium

N

Did Your Bank Pay You
This Much Interest
This Week?

MONEY MARKET RATES

FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

6.50
6.35
6.65
7.00
6.40
6.40
6.40
6.50
6.40
6.50

Bloomfield Savings
Comerica
Detroit & Northern
Empire of America
First Federal of Michigan
First of America
Manufacturers
Michigan National of Detroit
National Bank of Detroit
Standard Federal

MEMBER

BY HOWARD LOVY
Staff Writer

FSLIC

Federal Savings& Loan Insurance Corp.

Your Savings Insured to ;100,000

Insured up to
$100,000

Based on $2.500 deposit Some minimum deposit requirements may be lower.
Higher rates may be available for larger deposits.

WE PAY
EVEN
MORE!

An 'Oasis Of Peace'
Mingles Jews, Arabs

INTEREST RATE
UPDATE AS OF
I I-6-85

7.10

Franklin Savings

LOCAL NEWS

MONEY FUND ACCOUNT

Sp ec ial

7.40

Rate

Balance of S I 0,000 or more.
'Effective annual yield
ANNUAL PERCENTAGE based
on deposits for I
RATE
year atcarrent rate.
Limited time offer.

Franklin Savings

7.66,

EFFECTIVE ANNUAL
YIELD

Call Or Come In
For Details Today!
(313) 356-2102

26336 Twelve Mile Rd. (At Northwestern Highway).

Neve Shalom's Iyas Shbata and Ariella Bairi.

The Professionals' Choice For Investors



Salomon Brothers

1111 /40/111/e0eteriiiiet

MICHIGAN INSURED TAX-EXEMPT SERIES NUMBER 1

8.58% DOUBLE-TAX-FREE*

101110AN

! I T.ITIIIITITTIll H1111[111111 111111T111111111111111111MMETTI1Pr11111111111(1111

fl MTh

And. of course. you enjoy the benefit of
having Salomon Bi others bond experts
select the bonds which make up the
Trust
For a free brochure and Pro-
spectus containing more complete
information (including charges and
expenses) about putting the Salomon
Brothers Unit Investment Trust to work
earning you double-tax-free monthly
income. contact the Investment Rep-
resentative listed below. Naturally there
is no obligation of any kind. Please
read the Prospectus carefully before
investing or sending money

■ Double-tax-free monthly income'
■ Insured payments of principal and
interest• •
■ The Units in the Trust rated AAA by
Standard & Poor s
■ Convenience
■ A diversified. fixed portfolio of
Michigan Municipal Bonds
■ No management or redemption fees
■ Liquidity at the then-current net
asset value
■ Minimum investment of approxi-
mately S1.000

For 75 years investment professionals
have turned to Salomon Brothers for its
advice and expertise on financial mat-
ters Now. you can take advantage of
that same expertise as Salomon
Brothers announces this double-tax-
free product designed for Michigan
investors like yourself
This Salomon Brothers Unit
Investment Trust offers you a combi-
nation of benefits that make it one of
the most attractive tax-exempt oppor-
tunities available to Michigan investors

.

today

For more information, contact:

First of Michigan
Corporation

FcM

\I•mlirr , \al% 1nrk tilut k t xt flange, Inc

'Yt nrr earnings are free Irons federal state and local income
taxes However capital gains if any. will be subject to la x
cigr ent return represents the net annual interest ulcOrrir> of 1i
estimated annual expenses divided by the public offering pr It I ,
of S1,014.88 per unit on 10 25 85 This current return will var y
!rah changes in the public offering price interest income or
annual expenses
• •Insurance on municipal bonds in no way assures market value
,/vhich will fluctuate with changes in market conditions
he AAA rating from Standard 8 Poor s results from insurance,
relating only to the bonds and not to insurance on the units of the
a 5 .
Trust The insurance dpes nbt-Leinpvecnarket.ritki.4,sipc,e4t,41Q



.



-

• , •

John G. Hoagland
1000 W. University
Rochester, Michigan 48063
Phone: (313) 651-8880

_not guarantee the market value of true Trust units The prompt
of Pond interest and principal is insured The terms of
I)
tre more fully de,cr 'bed in the Prospectus No
insurar
representation is made as to the insurer s ability to meet its
conimitments
T his advertisement !Li neither an offer to sell nor a solicitation of
an offer to buy any of these securities The offering is made only
by the Prospectus Copies of the Prospectus may be obtained
In any State in which this announcement is circulated only from
such dealers or brokers as may lawfully offer these securities in
such State

46,111,•
It IC .
• .

16 12

.

,

141. f6:- !of, !1- 1

, ,•10

41.e. ,

Nestled in the hills above the
Israeli valley of Ayalon, in be-
tween Jerusalem and Tel Aviv,
lies an "Oasis of Peace." For
some, this oasis represents the
last and only hope for final
peace and understanding be-
tween Jews and Arabs.
Neve Shalom is the only vil-
lage in Israel where Jews and
Arabs live together, work to-
gether, and above all speak to-
gether in an effort to transcend
stereotypes and prejudices.
Two representatives from the
Neve Shalom community were
in Detroit last week as part of a
nation-wide tour. Their talk at
Wayne State University was
sponsored by several groups, in-
cluding the Union of Palestinian
Students and the B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundation.
Ariella Bairi is a Jewish
teacher and curriculum expert
at Neve Shalom's School For
Peace, and Iyas Shbata is a phi-
losophy and Hebrew major, and
an Arab. Both of them stressed
dialogue and understanding
other points of view as crucial
elements in achieving lasting
peace in Israel.
They said that most Jews and
Arabs are receiving educations
based only on what is happening
in their own spheres, being
taught a selective version of his-
tory. Neve Shalom was founded
13 years ago in an effort to
'combat this.
"Inside of Israel, and outside,
Jews and Arabs don't often
meet," Bairi said. "And when
they meet, when they see each
other, it's usually in very dif-
ficult conditions — the kinds of
conditions that don't bring fruit-
ful partnership together."
They said that Neve Shalom
provides Jews and Arabs with
the tools necessary for these
fruitful partnerships because,
like it or not, both peoples claim
strong ties to the same land.
"We make people aware of the
pluralism of their society and do
something together, because
each people alone will not suc-
ceed," she said. "It gives a
chance to re-evaluate their be-.
havior, re-evaluate their value

systems and see what kind of a zi
place we want to live in to-
gether."
"Together," however, is not a
word that appeals to many other
Israeli groups.
The visitors from Neve
Shalom described Israeli right
wing extremist groups, includ-
ing Rabbi Meir Kahane's Kach
party, as a "danger to democ-
racy," offering simplistic an-
swers to complex problems.
"This, we are trying to fight
— people like Kahane," Bairi
said. "Our community is
stronger in logic than Kahane." _(
Neve Shalom finds its
strength through education. In
fact, the Israeli government does
not support or recognize them as-(
a community, but as an "educa-
tional project," allowing them to
travel to schools throughout Is-
rael. Since 1980, 5,000 young
people and 1,000 adults in
mixed groups from Arab and <
Jewish communities throughout
Israel have attended conflict- -N
resolution workshops at Neve
Shalom. Each month, about 200
young people participate.
It is these young people, the
future leaders of Israel, to whom
Neve Shalom has the most ap-
peal, ironically counterbalancing
the right-wing extremist influ-
ence over Israel's young adults.
The spokesmen admit, how-
ever, that this educational proc-
ess is slow.
"You can't take instant soup
and mix it, and say, `OK, now,
everything is ready,"' Bairi said.
"People have to look inside
themselves."
"It's not easy to trust a group N
who comes to talk about conflict
resolution," she said. "You usu-
ally think, 'What are they after?
What will they make me do?
What will they make me believe
that I don't believe in now?' So
our approach is non-
indoctrinative."
After building this trust i t
the groups' own communities,
they bring them to Neve Shalom L'c
and the School For Peace.
Workshops are conducted
Arabic and. Hebrew, allowing
people to converse in the lan-

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