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November 08, 1985 - Image 65

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-11-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

cate this song to my Uncle
Moishe who's doing chai ..."
Special instructions go to his
accompanist of two years,
Michael Tornick, as Burstyn
prepares to sing Mazel. "Play it
from right to left," he says.
"This is Yiddish."
He spoofs the late French
singer, Maurice Chevalier, as he
sings a portion of Mazel with a
pseudo-French, nasal accent.
"I don't speak very good
French, but I look very French
when I sing French," he quips
as he winks one eye and gives
the audience a sideways glance.
Recipient of the Israel Bonds'
Israel Cultural Award, Burstyn
enjoys appearing before Bonds
groups. He says there's a "tre-
mendous" rapport with the
audience. "The people who come
to Bond events are motivated.
They're coming because they
want to help (Israel)."
Despite the jokes about Israel
and its leadership, Burstyn is
proud to consider himself an Is-
raeli. He encourages Jews to
come to Israel. And he finds Is-
rael safer than living in the
Bronx.
"I've been living in Israel
since 1962 because it's not safe
to live - in the Bronx anymore.
It's safer on the Gaza Strip."
And he's a safe bet for an
evening's entertainment. If the
response and requests for
encores are any indication of
how well he is liked, then the
youthful face the world sees on
stage and in film has a long
career ahead. ❑

Film Screened
In Poland

Warsaw (JTA) — Polish audi-
ences will soon be able to see
the French film Shoah, which
has been widely criticized in Po-
land for suggesting that a large
section of Polish society con-
doned the Nazis' anti-Jewish
policies.
According to the World
Jewish Congress (WJC), Polish
officials plan to show the ten-
hour film while reiterating that
the movie is defamatory and is
being used as a pretext to con-
tinue an anti-Polish press cam-
paign in France.
The decision to show the con-
troversial film illustrates Po-
land's policy in such matters is
to "present the facts, to speak
frankly on all subjects and to
permit everyone to form their
own views," Jerzy Urban, a
spokesman for the government
said.

Hunger Group

New York (JTA) — A new na-
tional Jewish organization
called Mazon (Sustenance) was
launched here last week as "a
Jewish response to hunger." The
organization will raise and pro-
vide funds to projects on the
local, national, and interna-
tional level designed to feed
Jews and non-Jews and to at-
tack the "root causes of hunger."

Friday, November 8, 1985

Advertising in The Jewish News
Gets Results
Place Your Ad Today.
Call 354-6060

O

If You've Never Been To
Mario's . . . Ask Mom and Dad

WHAT MAKES KINGSLEY
INN'S SUNDAY BRUNCH
SO GREAT ANYWAY?

AN■

Enjoy "OPERA NIGHT" Friday evenings 7 p.m.
With Dino Valle & Jan Rae

Entertainment
7 Nights

Banquet Facilities
Available

Mon-Fri. 11:30 a.m. to 1 a.m
Sat. 5 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Sun. 2 p.m. to 1 a.m.

.

DETROIT

Italian American Dining At Its Finest

4222 Second Blvd.
Bet. Willis & Canfield

Valet
Parking

65

833-9425

(Voted Detroit's No. 1 Sunday Brunch in Metropolitan Detroit
magazine's readers poll, Nov. '84 issue.)

•White linen and silver service.
•Elegant ambience of the Kingsley dining rooms.
•No compromise is ever made with quality or freshness.
•A dazzling, ever-changing array of breakfast, luncheon and
dinner favorites, and pastries from our own pastry chef, too
numerous to mention.
• Sane prices: only $8.95 for adults, $4.95 for children age 7
and under.

3:Kingsley 3Inn

Selected to serve at the U.S. Presidential Inaugurals
In Washington, D.C., 1981 and 1985.

WOODWARD AT LONG LAKE ROAD
BLOOMFIELD HILLS • 642 - 0100

G

RESTAURANT

Fine Dining
In An Elegant Atmosphere

Live Entertainment
and Dancing
Wed. Thru Sat.

NOW OPEN FOR LUNCH
11:30 a.m. TO 2:30 p.m.

Available For Private Parties

5586 Drake Road North of Maple, West Bloomfield

661-1920

FAMILY RESTAURANT

13400 W. 9 MILE RD.
Jost East of Coolidge
OAK PARK • 541-8480

GRAND OPENING

Our fish
and
chicken
travel

FRI., SAT. & SUN.—NOV. 8, 9 &

10
FABULOUS UNHEARD-OF PRICES!!

HERE ARE SOME SAMPLES
6 a.m. to 11 a.m.
BREAKFAST
69c
• FRESH KAISER OR' ONION ROLL & COFFEE
99c
• 2 EGGS, ANY ROLL OR TOAST & COFFEE
$1.25
• PANCAKES
11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
LUNCH
• FRESH GROUND HAMBURGER,
$1.95
FRIES & LARGE COKE
$2.50
• GYROS, FRIES & LARGE COKE
$1.95
• CORNED BEEF ON RYE WITH CUP OF SOUP .
4 p.m. to 9 p.m.
DINNER
$2.95
• FRESH CARVED ROAST BEEF
$2.95
• BAKED CHICKEN
$2.95
• FISH & CHIPS
$2.95
• SPAGHETTI WITH SALAD & GARLIC BREAD

ALL ABOVE DINNERS (EXCEPT SPAGHETTI) INCLUDE
SOUP OR SALAD, POT. OR VEG. AND BREAD BASKET

No matter which
of these delicious combi-
nations you choose,
you've picked a couple
of winners.
Like our tender
Teriyaki Chicken with
fresh filet of Sole. Baked Mushroom Chicken
with fresh Trout. And Savory Chicken
Piccata with fresh Pacific Snapper.
Your satisfying double entree, available
through November 15, comes with sun-ripened

vegetables.
Fluffy
brown rice pilaf.
Just-baked, ten-grain
rolls. And a crisp gar-
den salad or hot
homemade soup.
All for only $6.95.
And only at the
Good Earth Restaurant.

the

9 ood earth

Restaurant and Bakery

ORCHARD LAKE RD. AT 14 MILE

AM. TO TALLY HALL—FARMINGTON HILLS

626-4575

MON.-THURS. 7 a.m.-10 p.m.,

FRI. & SAT. 7 a.m.-11 p.m., SUN. 8 a.m.-9 p.m.

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